First-Year Experience
Georgia Southern University

Seminar Themes, Fall 2014

During SOAR, all first-year students enroll in a First-Year Seminar (FYE 1220). The course is mandatory in the fall semester.  In this course, you’ll learn information literacy and other research skills by investigating a theme of your choosing.

Browse First-Year Seminars

Read through the themes below in order to complete your ranking worksheet. Click the column headings to sort by that column.  You can also search by keyword using the search box at the top right of the table.  “College” in this table refers to the college of the primary faculty member teaching the course.  Please note, though: you are not limited to a course taught by a faculty member from the college in which your major is located. You’ll learn more about your college at SOAR.

College Abbreviations (click to expand)
CEIT = College of Engineering and Information Technology
CHHS = College of Health and Human Sciences
CLASS = College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
COBA = College of Business Administration
COE = College of Education
COSM = College of Science and Mathematics
Other Faculty = faculty in other colleges, the Henderson Library, or university administration
Seminar Ranking Worksheet: Complete before SOAR!

Before your advisor will release you to register, he or she will ask to see your theme ranking worksheet.  In order to not delay your registration process, complete this form and bring it with you to your advisement session at SOAR: .doc format.pdf format

Please note: bring this completed form to SOAR. You do not need to send this form to Georgia Southern in advance.


ThemeDescriptionSecCRNDays/TimesInstructorCollege
Echoes of the Odyssey in Popular CultureHomer’s epic poem The Odyssey relates the journey of the Greek hero Odysseus as he travels home from the Trojan War, and the poem's influence can be seen in popular culture today. We’ll discuss some of the music, films, and texts that demonstrate this theme to better understand Odysseus’ journey and perhaps even our own.A85321T, 2-3:15 & Th, 2-2:50 (thru 10/9)Williams, Leigh Ann & Christy CurleyCLASS
The Philosophy of Bruce LeeBruce Lee is one of the most recognizable stars in the history of cinema, but few people know that he was also an expert on eastern philosophy and completed a degree in western philosophy at the University of Washington. Lee used the conceptual tools of western philosophy to deconstruct traditional Wing Chun Kung Fu and and develop Jeet Kune Do, a free-style form of Kung Fu that values effectiveness over tradition. This course examines Lee's philosophical writings and how they influenced his work.AA85348T, 9:30-10:45 & Th, 9:30-10:20 (thru 10/9)Eaton, William & Mallory RogersCLASS
American Fiction and ChangeFiction is a mirror reflecting the rapidly changing face of American culture. This course will explore the many societal changes that America has undergone and how those shifting scenes are brought to life in creative writing, from the myriad views of war and economic change to those regional and cultural differences celebrated by our unique blend of people. Like the railroad, fiction, popularized in affordable magazines, helped link together America's vast and various regions. In addition to the focus on cultural revolutions, this course will also consider the impact of change on those who undergo both subtle and sudden shifts as characters attempt to deal with a variety of crises. Most importantly, such transformations and their impact can be particularly helpful in coming to terms with the forces of change in our own lives.AAB85511T, 11-12:15 & Th, 11-11:50 (thru 10/9)Edenfield, Olivia & Julie RandersonCLASS
NanotechnologyNanotechnology is interdisciplinary in nature and at the forefront of the 21st century technology. This course will introduce students to nanotechnology and engage and excite them in such technological advances. This section will focus on in-class presentation on basic concepts such as (a) the differentiation between macro, micro and nano scale; (b) description of the forces significant at the nano scale; (c) identification of existing and potential engineering applications of nanotechnology; and, (d) exposure to typical computational techniques and experimental instruments used in nano scale technology. The section will also include an activity that involves nano scale image analysis with a lab tour to demonstrate the nano materials and materials processing at nano scale. Students will use a Field Effect Scanning Electron Microscope to visually see nano particles.AAC85340M & W, 11:15-12:05Mitra, AniruddahCEIT
From Combat to the ClassroomThis FYE 1220 section is designed for veterans, military service members, family members of military service personal, ROTC cadets or anyone who cares about veteran’s issues. Together we will explore cultural and social influences that may impact veterans as they transition from active duty into higher education as well as current military service members who are still serving. We will assess potential barriers to veteran success as well as resources here on campus that can assist in successful integration. Along with campus resources, this course is intended to assist in building and expanding the student’s social support network with other students in this course. This course is taught by a veteran and is designed to be interactive to allow veterans to draw upon their experiences to assist in planning their collegiate experience.AAE85423M & W, 1:25-2:15Jordan, ErinCHHS
The Pep TalkThis particular section of FYE 1220 is structured around Dr. Kevin Elko’s 12 key lessons to success. The goal is to be inspired! You’ll have the opportunity to apply The Pep Talk to your life. Be prepared to work hard, have fun, and be inspired!AAG85490T & Th, 3:30-4:20DeLuca, Lauren & Jennifer BryantOther Faculty
Free SpeechIn 1964, Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. wrote in  New York Times v. Sullivan  that the First Amendment provides that "debate on public issues ... [should be] ... uninhibited, robust, and wide-open." In practice, however, Americans have vigorously disputed the application of the First Amendment. Most people believe in the right to free speech, but debate whether it should cover flag-burning, music lyrics, advertising, hate speech, pornography, and other forms of symbolic speech. Many would agree to limiting some forms of free expression. We will tackle this issue by first placing free speech in a global perspective. Next, we will look at some classic challenges to the freedom of expression in American history. Finally, we will try to project what the future holds for this basic human right.AAH86062W, 4-5:15 & M, 4-4:50 (thru 10/13)Downs, Alan & Juan EscobarCLASS
Using Technology in your College JourneyNearly every student will bring at least one computing device with them to Georgia Southern, but few know how to begin to use them as tools for learning and as aids for studying. This course will focus on those devices and how they can be valuable to students in ways other than for just chatting and gaming. We'll cover the care and feeding of computing devices and how to keep them running.AAI85491T & Th, 5-5:50Reaves, PaulOther Faculty
Ireland & YouThe U.S. is certainly an "Irish" country! More than one in ten Americans claim Irish descent; St. Patrick's Day celebrations continue to grow in number and size even in cities with few, if any, ties to Ireland; nearly 1 million Americans visit Ireland annually. Explore this American attraction to all-things-Irish through discussions about Irish music, dance, poetry, art, movies, society, politics, and language. With its unique blend of old-world culture and charm with the youngest, most globalized workforce in the world, Ireland offers wonderful opportunities for study abroad and potential careers. Whether you're Irish all year long or only on St. Patrick's Day, come explore your "Irishness" and learn more about the intriguing land of St. Patrick, Yeats, Joyce, JFK, U2, and Guinness.AAM85464M & W, 5:30-6:20Bruner, MarlaOther Faculty
What is the Right Thing to do?In this section, we will be talking about all aspects of life; we will also talk about schools . . . the way they were, the way they are and the way they could be. Also, we will be discussing what we should be getting from our college experience. For example, does your education help you know what is the right thing to do morally and ethically?AAW86038T, 9:30-10:45 & Th, 9:30-10:20 (thru 10/9)Moore, Michael & Zack DavidsonCOE
History and FilmThis course is structured around three historically-significant films that dramatize aspects of the American, French, and Iranian Revolutions. Through viewing and discussing these films, you'll analyze and critically evaluate the causes of the revolutions. You'll also evaluate films as public history, as art, and as a window into contemporary historical memory. Students will write four short (2-3 page) evaluations of the films, assigned readings and discussions. Be prepared to view, discuss, write and learn!AAX86624M & W, 10:10-11Burson, JeffCLASS
Tax Fraud: Ethics & Case StudiesThis course explores U.S. tax fraud, from individual fraud to large scale corporate. The course will begin with an introduction to the U.S. legal system and will then progress to a discussion of general principles of ethics, criminal law in the U.S. and the law of fraud. A number of laws governing fraud generally and tax fraud specifically will be covered. The latter half of the course will involve case studies in tax fraud.AAY86023T & Th, 11-11:50Wiggins, MichaelOther Faculty
History of Rock-n-RollRock-n-roll is a way of life and has been with us for over 50 years. We will be tracing the origins of rock-n-roll in the 1950s and seeing its development through the decades of the 20th century and into our current time. We will look at the various incarnations and styles of rock-n-roll such as psychedelic, classic rock, heavy metal, alternative, industrial, reggae, rap, funk, and punk.AAZ85476M & W, 11:15-12:05Czech, MikeOther Faculty
Musics of the WorldNothing brings together a mass of people as much as a song or a piece of music. Picture a million people dancing and moving to the same beat. In this course, students are introduced to musics from around the world and discuss why music is such an important part of societies and what defines it. This course is not about music history; it is about listening . . . with an open mind!ABA86039T, 12:30-1:45 & Th, 12:30-1:20 (thru 10/9)Gendelman, Martin & Bryan BulmerCLASS
The Cold War in American FilmThis course will examine American films of the Cold War and pay particular attention to the impact they had on American culture. We will discuss the ways that films impacted American views of the Cold War and shaped American perceptions of the Russians.AC85374M & W, 1:25-2:15Feltman, BrianCLASS
Art on CampusMany students rarely step foot in the art museum on a college campus. This course will center around viewing art on and around campus. By using various critical approaches to art analysis (describe, interpret, analyze and judge), students will learn how to critically evaluate the art objects/experiences in their immediate surroundings. Methods of instruction will include field trips, discussion and lecture. A writing component will ensure students are able to write critically about the visual phenomenon in their world. Professor Bielski is an Assistant Professor of Foundation Studies at Georgia Southern and is a practicing painter.AEQ87416T, 3:30-4:45 & Th, 3:30-4:20 (thru 10/9)Bielski, Sarah & Lauren KennedyCLASS
Terrorism Risk and ResponseThis course examines the topic of terrorism in its various international and domestic forms as well as counter-terrorism efforts. The different aspects of terrorism students will encounter include political, nationalist, and religious motivations, as well as state-sponsored terrorism, technology's role in terrorism, and state responses. This seminar will explore terrorism's definition, components, and history through class readings and discussion. Students will also create terrorism risk assessments for a country of their choosing.AF85377W, 4-5:15 & M, 4-4:50 (thru 10/13)Gayan, Melissa & Erin ClearyCLASS
1980s Pop CultureThe 1980s saw great change, but “pop culture” is what made the 1980s. Each week during this FYE course, we will focus on an area of ​1980s Pop Culture, including, but not limited to:  music, movies, TV, fashion, toys, and many other areas. This will be a fun-filled and educational course. You will learn to say, “I Love the 80s.”AG85379T, 5-6:15 & Th, 5-5:50 (thru 10/9)Bailey, Sara & Amy Wilkins-SmithOther Faculty
Servant LeadershipWe are so used to being served! We demand to be served! Does that make us leaders over those who serve us? Being a servant can prepare you to lead. Learn to serve, which in turn, will teach you to empower others, creating an unstoppable team. Explore opportunities to serve at Georgia Southern. Consider where you would like to lead. Empower others to soar!AH85380M & W, 5:30-6:20Shepherd, KathyCEIT
Engineering ChallengesStudents will investigate the challenges that engineers face and solve by using new technologies, and they will learn the science and technology skills required to develop such solutions.AJ85382T & Th, 9:30-10:20Molina, GustavoCEIT
FilmIn this section we will critically examine exemplary films as works of art by considering aspects such as genre, dialogue, action, character, and plot, as well as discuss cinematic techniques used in the service of those aspects.AL85384T, 11-12:15 & Th, 11-11:50 (thru 10/9)Edwards, Bradley & Caitlyn EvansCLASS
Got Brains?: Zombie and Freshman Year SurvivalThis course will examine the history of zombies, historical disasters, stages of group development, and other areas as they relate to a fictitious zombie apocalypse. A strong focus will be on "Georgia in Film" due to the TV show The Walking Dead. In addition, guest speakers will present on the spread of infectious diseases and the role of the Center for Disease Control in outbreaks.AM85385M & W, 11:15-12:05Duggar, TheresaCOE
Math Goes to HollywoodMath in the movies and television can be informative, interesting, humorous, and integral to the plot. We will examine many instances of math in Hollywood, such as Cast Away, Numb3rs, Die Hard with a Vengeance, The Wizard of Oz, and October Sky. We will then study the intricacies behind these concepts.AN85386M & W, 1:25-2:15Yocco, LisaCOSM
The Pep TalkThis particular section of FYE 1220 is structured around Dr. Kevin Elko’s 12 key lessons to success. The goal is to be inspired! You’ll have the opportunity to apply The Pep Talk to your life. Be prepared to work hard, have fun, and be inspired!AO85387T & Th, 2-2:50Cross, LydiaCOE
Teach Better, Learn BetterStudents will relate their own experiential learning from K-12 and determine how those skills learned in their school career apply to their academic skills now that they have entered college.AP85388W, 2:30-3:45 & M, 2:30-3:20 (thru 10/13)Drawdy, Kymberly & Amanda WheelerCOE
Think Like a Professional Care ProviderAs a healthcare provider, professional communication and ethical decision making are essential. The theme of this FYE class will focus on the socialization process into the healthcare profession each student identifies as their prospective future. Real-life scenarios are used to apply ethical principles and debates using the ethical decision making process are encouraged for open discussion. Activities include interviewing healthcare professionals, developing productive group dynamics, and scholarly writing.AR85390W, 4-5:15 & M, 4-4:50 (thru 10/13)Mossholder, Margaret & Tierza WattsCHHS
Snapbacks & Tattoos vs. Suit & Tie: Black America's Definition of MasculinityImages of what it means to be a "man," sometimes negative, are depicted throughout social media and the lives of celebrities. For the many African-American men growing up without a father figure or positive role model, these images become their reality of what it means to be a man. Students will explore the cultural and social contexts of manhood for African-American men.AS85391T & Th, 5-5:50Thomas, DariusCOE
Conquering CollegeDramatic life changes – such as moving to college – have the ability to result in an unbalanced, less-than-awesome version of you. In this course, you will learn how to combat some classic pitfalls, and discuss how to ensure a fun and successful experience at Georgia Southern. Topics include nutrition, time management, independence, stress relief, relationships, sleeping habits, goal setting, fitness and exercise, on-campus involvement, career possibilities, and more!AT85392M & W, 5:30-6:20Hervey, MalerieOther Faculty
What is the Right Thing to do?In this section, we will be talking about all aspects of life; we will also talk about schools . . . the way they were, the way they are and the way they could be. Also, we will be discussing what we should be getting from our college experience. For example, does your education help you know what is the right thing to do morally and ethically?AV85394Th, 9:30-10:45 & T, 9:30-10:20 (thru 10/7)Moore, Michael & Stephanie RewitzerCOE
Teachers and FilmThis course will examine the reality of students and teachers in films. Students will view films that feature teachers and conduct a character analysis. In the process, they will compare the events and characters to their own lives, making connections to improve learning and their future goals and aspirations.AX85396M & W, 10:10-11Howerter, CatherineCOE
Incest, Poison, and Murder: Demystifying the Borgias, Renaissance Italy’s Most Infamous FamilyThe Borgias are known as one of the most notorious Renaissance families in Italy. History has seen them as highly unsavory characters, and simply mentioning the name within the walls of the Vatican could bring chills. Popular movies, novels, TV shows, and even video games have featured one or more of the infamous family members who are usually cast as villainous in nature. More often than not, murder, poison, greed, treachery, and lust feature strongly in representations of the family. But how accurate are these portrayals, and how much truth actually lies within these so-called black legends which have become so prevalent in popular culture? Learn more about these stories and the actual historical facts surrounding the house of Borgia and their rise to infamy. In this course we will learn about members of the Borgia family and compare popular culture to that of actual historical accounts, and also how to accurately evaluate sources about historic people and events.AZ85398M & W, 11:15-12:05Jackson, KatrinaOther Faculty
Food and SustainabilityWhat should we eat for dinner? We all ask this question, but have you ever thought about it on a deeper level? Why do people choose to buy organic foods, be vegetarian, or buy local? In this section of FYE, we will discuss how our food is grown, where it is grown, and the subsequent consequences to sustainable living. To facilitate our discussion, we will read  The Omnivore's Dilemma  and other related materials, watch food documentaries, and visit both a local farmer's market and a local grocery store. Our discussion will focus on a biological perspective by comparing agricultural systems with natural ecosystems and by considering the health implications of our diet. The course will end with a meal made from locally grown food.B85322M & W, 1:25-2:15Cawthorn, MichelleCOSM
Solutions to Epidemic Meltdown: ZombieSTEMUsing the recent focus on a Zombie Apocalypse as a framework, we will investigate real world epidemic threats such as influenza. Students will take an interdisciplinary approach to creating solutions to the meltdown of society from communications and logistics to simple survival and dissemination of information when an infrastructure is no longer in place. They will investigate historical epidemics such as the plague and consider how, with limited skills and resources, to not just simply cure and survive, to but to rebuild.BA85399T, 2-3:15 & Th, 2-2:50 (thru 10/9)Sturges, Diana & Eric BurnsCHHS
Terrorism Risk and ResponseThis course examines the topic of terrorism in its various international and domestic forms as well as counter-terrorism efforts. The different aspects of terrorism students will encounter include political, nationalist, and religious motivations, as well as state-sponsored terrorism, technology's role in terrorism, and state responses. This seminar will explore terrorism's definition, components, and history through class readings and discussion. Students will also create terrorism risk assessments for a country of their choosing.BAA86041W, 2:30-3:45 & M, 2:30-3:20 (thru 10/13)Gayan, Melissa & Nicole WithersCLASS
2012 PhenomenaExplore 2012 Phenomena. Take a step back from doomsday theories to grasp the facts and myths surrounding events associated with 2012. This course will seek to answer questions about climatology and weather with a focus on the increasing number and severity of disasters, weakening of the earth's magnetosphere, solar storms, and changes in the earth's polarity.BBB86043T & Th, 5-5:50Fernekes, RobertOther Faculty
Sport ScienceThis seminar is designed to provide an overview of sports science. Emphasis is placed on the exercise sciences (including anatomy and exercise physiology), nutrition, exercise technique, program design, organization and administration, and testing and evaluation.BBH85465M & W, 5:30-6:20Rossi, StephenCHHS
Money MattersWhether you have money or not, you need to understand how you can take control of your financial situation and plan for the future. This course will go over some basic principles of personal finances and teach some healthy financial skills all individuals need. You'll learn some practical skills in this course, such as how to balance your finances and how to invest in a 401(k).BD85401T & Th, 8-8:50Melton, BridgetCHHS
What Would You Do?Would you cheat if you knew you’d never get caught? Would you speak up if someone was doing something wrong?  In this FYE seminar, we will discuss how to incorporate Georgia Southern V.A.L.U.E.S. into your college experience and beyond.BE85403M & W, 9:05-9:55Whitesel, MarkOther Faculty
Logic and ParadoxesThe basic principles that constitute the foundation and logical coherence of human reasoning have been seriously challenged by both philosophy and the mathematical sciences on more than one occasion. These challenges are often called “paradoxes,” and they indicate that some of the most deeply ingrained and widely accepted principles of human reasoning, such as certain ideas on which arithmetic is founded, are fragile and certainly worth questioning. In this course we shall examine a number of these problems, including their origins and implications, as well as possible solutions to these conundrums. This is not a course about religion; rather, this is a course about certain serious conceptual problems that serve to show that the conventional abstract sciences are only inches away from disaster. Moreover, this course presupposes no background beyond elementary arithmetic. All other methods and concepts are explained from scratch.BEB86627T & Th, 9:30-10:20Higgerson, RobertCLASS
Got Brains?: Zombie and Freshman Year SurvivalThis course will examine the history of zombies, historical disasters, stages of group development, and other areas as they relate to a fictitious zombie apocalypse. A strong focus will be on "Georgia in Film" due to the TV show The Walking Dead. In addition, guest speakers will present on the spread of infectious diseases and the role of the Center for Disease Control in outbreaks.BH85406M & W, 10:10-11Duggar, TheresaCOE
Food and SustainabilityWhat should we eat for dinner? We all ask this question, but have you ever thought about it on a deeper level? Why do people choose to buy organic foods, be vegetarian, or buy local? In this section of FYE, we will discuss how our food is grown, where it is grown, and the subsequent consequences to sustainable living. To facilitate our discussion, we will read  The Omnivore's Dilemma  and other related materials, watch food documentaries, and visit both a local farmer's market and a local grocery store. Our discussion will focus on a biological perspective by comparing agricultural systems with natural ecosystems and by considering the health implications of our diet. The course will end with a meal made from locally grown food.BI85407T & Th, 11-11:50Cawthorn, MichelleCOSM
Write for Your LifeIn this course, students think, read, and write about college expectations and student success. A sub-theme is "Don't be a statistic." Plan to be a student who completes his or her college education.BK85409T, 2-3:15 & Th, 2-2:50 (thru 10/9)Albertson, Kathy & Jana BrileyCLASS
Free SpeechIn 1964, Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. wrote in New York Times v. Sullivan  that the First Amendment provides that "debate on public issues ... [should be] ... uninhibited, robust, and wide-open." In practice, however, Americans have vigorously disputed the application of the First Amendment. Most people believe in the right to free speech, but debate whether it should cover flag-burning, music lyrics, advertising, hate speech, pornography, and other forms of symbolic speech. Many would agree to limiting some forms of free expression. We will tackle this issue by first placing free speech in a global perspective. Next, we will look at some classic challenges to the freedom of expression in American history. Finally, we will try to project what the future holds for this basic human right.BL85410W, 2:30-3:45 & M, 2:30-3:20 (thru 10/13)Downs, Alan & Anna FazioCLASS
Experience Matters: Co-Ops and InternshipsThis FYE 1220 course is designed to introduce students in engineering, information technology, computer science, construction management (or other majors where internships and co-ops are common) to the cooperative education (co-op) learning model. Students will explore careers topics and develop the strategies and skills necessary for effective participation in co-ops and internships. The course will cover the history and current trends in cooperative education; how to effectively search and apply for internship and co-op positions; and how to enhance professionalism in the workplace. Students will be given the opportunity to interact with industry representatives throughout the course.BLA85393T & Th, 3:30-4:20Pollett, JayOther Faculty
Scholarly Information Discovery in the Networked Academic Learning EnvironmentFor many undergraduates, it is very challenging to search needed information in the age of information explosion. To improve their academic performance, this course is designed to teach first-year undergraduates how to access and locate information more effectively and efficiently. To foster skills of critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making, undergraduate students are trained to retrieve full-text and peer-reviewed academic information across different applications, databases, networks, platforms, and systems. The course is designed not only to improve students’ academic performance, but also to promote their future career development in the ever-changing competitive world beyond.BN85412T & Th, 5-5:50Li, LiLiOther Faculty
Being a Successful College StudentSo, you made it to college. Now what? Learn what the research tells us about becoming a successful college student. Identify the behaviors and strategies that are connected to student success.BP85413M & W, 5:30-6:20Cason, SusanOther Faculty
Money Matters 101Getting started on the right financial foot at the beginning of college is critical for a lifetime of financial security. This course will focus on how to make smart personal money decisions including cash flow, budgeting, and avoiding debt. Get control of your personal finances early in your young adulthood. Learn easy, fun principles of handling money and you will discover that Money Matters.BQ85414T & R, 12:30-1:20Bland, HelenOther Faculty
Girls and Women in SportsThis course will focus on the social and cultural history of female athleticism. Topics will include: changing social perceptions of the female athlete; social, cultural, and legal barriers to participation; opportunities for female athletes at different levels of sport (recreational youth sports, interscholastic and intercollegiate sports, professional sports); how race and social class affect girls' and women's sporting experiences; and, homophobia within women's sports.BY85420M & W, 9:05-9:55Malcom, NancyCLASS
FilmIn this section we will critically examine exemplary films as works of art by considering aspects such as genre, dialogue, action, character, and plot, as well as discuss cinematic techniques used in the service of those aspects.BZ85416T, 9:30-10:45 & Th, 9:30-10:20 (thru 10/9)Edwards, Bradley & Jana BrileyCLASS
Spain thru the Artists' EyesSpain thru the Artists’ Eyes provides students with the opportunity to learn about Spain’s culture and history as viewed through the eyes of many of Spain’s most well known artists. The course will address various historical periods, artists, creative practices, and themes.C85323M & W, 10:10-11McGrath, MichaelCLASS
Winning at MathFor many students math is one of the most difficult subjects in college. Every student must pass at least one math course to graduate. Many students are intimidated by math due to a variety of reasons. However, math is the "critical filter" for education. The more math you have had, the more job opportunities you will have. Math anxiety is an emotional or physical response to taking math courses or any math-related situation. Math anxiety is a learned behavior and can be unlearned! A student who is anxious about a test or about math in general is focusing attention on himself and his uncomfortable feelings instead of directing his attention on learning the concept or completing the course. Methods to overcome math-anxious feelings will be investigated.CA85418M & W, 12:20-1:10Smith, ChasenCOSM
All About the BenjaminsThis course exposes students to the basic tools and techniques necessary for the development of a successful personal financial plan over one’s lifespan. Topics include money management and credit use, the importance of saving, budgeting practices, and setting and reaching financial goals.CAA86048Th, 12:30-1:45 & T, 12:30 - 1:20 (thru 10/7)Boatman, Trey & Kimberlee YontzOther Faculty
What's it Mean to be a "Good Woman," Anyway?With role models from Beyoncé to Hillary Clinton, the modern-day definition of a good woman has become more abstract than ever. Students in this course will evaluate and reflect on how the media portrays women physically, mentally, spiritually, and sexually, ultimately formulating their own opinion about what it means to be a good woman.CB85419M & W, 1:25-2:15Hedrick, AmandaCLASS
Journey of SelfTwentieth-century writer GK Chesterton stated, “Mythology is a search. It combines a recurrent desire with a recurrent doubt. It’s not the prophet saying, ‘These things are.’ It's the voice of a dreamer saying, ‘Why cannot these things be?’" Myths, particularly those of Ancient Greece, need not be read as a primitive society’s attempts to answer questions about their worldview. Mythology is a prophecy of today; it grapples with those invisible, incredibly powerful forces that crop up to challenge us: love, lust, power, jealousy, emotional maturation, family, and contradictions of the self. This course is not entirely focused on literature, though we will read excerpts of some plays and poems, and explore our relationship to our world (self identity, college, community, and beyond) through interdisciplinary research and enlivened writing assignments.CCC86042T, 2-3:15 & Th, 2-2:50 (thru 10/9)Bush, Zachary & Sara BaileyCLASS
Leadership & Social InnovationThis course will focus on leadership that leads to social innovation. Students will discover their unique leadership capabilities by focusing on their individual values and strengths. The course will focus on the Do Good Well method that harnesses personal leadership through creativity and innovation to form an action plan that can establish lasting solutions to social problems. As a part of this course, students will identify methods for leaders to follow to establish lasting social innovations.CCZ86623M & W, 2:30-3:20Banter, JohnOther Faculty
NFL: Fantasy and RealityThis course will focus on two things: the history, evolution, and explosion of the fantasy sports industry and the history of and major problems plaguing the National Football League (head injuries, PEDs, hazing, etc.). Each student will manage their own fantasy football team and participate in a group presentation. All are welcome, whether you are a diehard football fan or not!CD85421T & Th, 3:30-3:20Hall, EricCLASS
Identity & Creative Expression“To practice any art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow. So do it.” --Kurt Vonnegut. Your journey as a college student is up to you. Your time here at Georgia Southern will give you the opportunity to learn about yourself and your place in the world. You have an identity, and it is up to you to really figure out and define your identity. This course provides an overview of identity and college student development theories coupled with assignments that will ask students to creatively demonstrate, “Who am I and who am I becoming?” Students will make meaning of their identity through creative expression. Examples include visual art, photography, music, dance, spoken word or written poetry. CE85422T, 5-6:15 & Th, 5-5:50 (thru 10/9)Brooks, Jordan & Danielle BostickOther Faculty
Being An African American Male In AmericaIn this course, we will seek to explore the depths of the African-American male experience. This course can be described best by the poem: "So we stand here/ On the edge of hell/ In Harlem/ And look out on the world/ And wonder/ What we're gonna do/ In the face of/ What we remember." —Langston HughesCG85424M & W, 5:30-6:20Baugh, MichaelOther Faculty
Winning at MathFor many students math is one of the most difficult subjects in college. Every student must pass at least one math course to graduate. Many students are intimidated by math due to a variety of reasons. However, math is the "critical filter" for education. The more math you have had, the more job opportunities you will have. Math anxiety is an emotional or physical response to taking math courses or any math-related situation. Math anxiety is a learned behavior and can be unlearned! A student who is anxious about a test or about math in general is focusing attention on himself and his uncomfortable feelings instead of directing his attention on learning the concept or completing the course. Methods to overcome math-anxious feelings will be investigated.CH85425T & Th, 8-8:50Winskie, AmyCOSM
Strategy & BackgammonExperienced successful business professionals develop a winning game plan. This doesn’t happen suddenly, and is the result of good short term and long term decision making based on past experiences, the current environment, future predictions, and the need for changing strategies. Backgammon is a board game that will expose you to the disciplines of probability, risk assessment, trend analysis, creativity, psychology, and a little bit of intuition and luck. All students will learn to win playing backgammon through computer simulation, Internet site competitors, and face to face competition with fellow friends, students, faculty, and citizens in the community.CI85426M & W, 9:05-9:55Berecz, DonCOBA
Maximizing Performance in College and LifeWhether in academics, career selection or beyond, maximizing your performance to meet your goals is essential.  In this course, we'll use Gallup®’s StrengthsQuest assessment tool to discover your Top 5 Signature Strengths. From this discovery, the remainder of the course will be an exploration of how you can tap into these strengths to make the most out of your time at Georgia Southern. Through in-class and out-of-class activities, small and large group discussion and practical application, get excited to begin the most near perfect quest of your life – your StrengthsQuest!CJ85427T & Th, 9:30-10:20Adams, JonathanOther Faculty
Nanoscience & TechnologyNanotechnology is interdisciplinary in nature and at the forefront of the 21st century technology. This course will introduce students to nanotechnology and engage and excite them in such technological advances. This section will focus on in-class presentation on basic concepts such as (a) the differentiation between macro, micro and nano scale; (b) description of the forces significant at the nano scale; (c) identification of existing and potential engineering applications of nanotechnology; and, (d) exposure to typical computational techniques and experimental instruments used in nano scale technology. The section will also include an activity that involves nano scale image analysis with a lab tour to demonstrate the nano materials and materials processing at nano scale. Students will use a Field Effect Scanning Electron Microscope to visually see nano particles.CK85428M & W, 10:10-11Salekeen, Sirajus CEIT
Good GriefDeath and dying, grief and loss: these concepts are identified, explained, investigated and even applied by simulation activities and in-depth discussions of real-life experiences. Whether you have been the outsider or the insider when it comes to death and loss, we have much to teach each other on this much avoided but extremely essential topic. From the maturational losses experienced by every college freshmen to the disenfranchised losses experienced by others throughout their lives, this class brings it all to the forefront, with feelings of awkwardness to feelings of normalcy, and unique bonds that are sure to stick.CL85429M & W, 12:20-1:10Johnson, AbbyCLASS
Popular Culture of the 1990sOn the popular culture scene, the 1990s brought us the Spice Girls, Backstreet Boys, and Dr. Dre's The Chronic; 90210, Baywatch, and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air; Clueless, Goodfella's, and Wayne's World; and Michael Jordan, Mark McGwire, and Sammy Sosa. This course will explore the significance and legacy of the music, film, television, and sports icons that best represent the culture and fads of the nineties.CM85430T & Th, 12:30-1:20Abreu, ChristinaCLASS
What's it Mean to be a "Good Man," Anyway?What's it mean to be a "good man," anyway? Society surrounds us with conflicting images and assumptions. In this course, students will research varied presentations of masculinity in the world around them and reflect critically on what being a “good man” means to them.D85324M & W, 1:25-2:15Keane, DrewCLASS
The Chemistry of ColorColor is a very exciting property of nature. We will explore what color is and its physical, chemical, and biological causes, both in class and on the Internet. We will be looking at dyes, gems, rainbows, and much else.DD85351T, 2-3:15 & Th, 2-2:50 (thru 10/9)Hurst, Michael & Cherelle PickneyCOSM
Relationships & the MediaThis course will look at how media influence interpersonal relationships (both romantic and non-romantic) between individuals. The class will discuss specific interpersonal communication concepts and explore how they play out in mediated contexts. Topics will include relationships with media personalities (both real and fictional); the use of media (e.g., social networking such as Twitter, smart phone applications such as Tinder, Internet sites, and texting) to begin, maintain, and end relationships; and discussion of the positive and negative aspects of using media to communicate with friends, family, and romantic partners.DDD86608T & Th, 3:30-4:20Plew, MelissaCLASS
Effective CommunicationThe development of effective communication skills is often identified as the single most important attribute that employers seek in college graduates. This course provides an overview of basic principles and strategies of effective communication in order to develop and improve oral presentation skills, interpersonal communication skills, small group communication skills and understanding mass media messages.E85325M & W, 4-4:50Geyerman, ChrisCLASS
Black Men in AmericaStatistically, the African-American male has a shorter life expectancy and is being incarcerated at a rate higher than any other demographic group. Fewer Black men go to college than their female counterparts. Regardless of social status, the Black male's experiences in the legal system, educational environment, and work place have often been challenging. This seminar will develop an understanding of various stereotypes, norms, and social stigma in ways to promote positive citizenship and strong moral values.EE85352T & Th, 5-5:50Taylor, IssacOther Faculty
Technology in the 21st CenturyThe exponential rate by which technology is progressing has created multiple opportunities to share and consume information. This course will explore how modern technologies such as social media, tablet PCs, educational gaming, Blogs, and mobile devices are being used to enhance student learning and improve the quality of life when used appropriately.FA88090T & Th, 8-8:50LaFrance, DianeCOE
The American Road NarrativeFrom Jack Kerouac's On the Road to Sherman Alexie's "This Is What It Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona," America's unique fixation on the open road has been reflected in many of its narratives. We will study both classic and lesser known American road narratives while considering why the road holds such allure for some, what it means to be on the road, and why the road offers unique perspective.FD88093T, 11-12:15 & Th, 11-11:50 (thru 10/9)Berger, Andrew & Greyson CatoCLASS
The Art of Walt Disney and its Impact on Mass MediaThis course explores Walt Disney and the Disney Studio's contributions to animation, illustration and theme park design from 1936 to 1986. What are the lasting effects of these contributions within mass media, on popular culture, and in relation to consumption?FF85353T, 12:30-1:45 & Th, 12:30-1:20 (thru 10/9)Burke, Jessica & Sally AdamsCLASS
Major in SuccessMajor in Success is about living a radically successful life. This means landing (or creating) your dream job right out of college, or soon thereafter. It means living a life that brings you real joy, meaning, and satisfaction—not just a good-paying job. And, most importantly, it means starting to fulfill your dreams right now—not months or years down the road.FG88095T & Th, 2-2:50Riles, WarrenOther Faculty
Winning at MathFor many students math is one of the most difficult subjects in college. Every student must pass at least one math course to graduate. Many students are intimidated by math due to a variety of reasons. However, math is the "critical filter" for education. The more math you have had, the more job opportunities you will have. Math anxiety is an emotional or physical response to taking math courses or any math-related situation. Math anxiety is a learned behavior and can be unlearned! A student who is anxious about a test or about math in general is focusing attention on himself and his uncomfortable feelings instead of directing his attention on learning the concept or completing the course. Methods to overcome math-anxious feelings will be investigated.FH88096M & W, 1:25-2:15Smith, ChasenCOSM
What Can Cartoons Teach You About College?Cartoons aren’t just for kids anymore. From Spongebob to The Simpsons to South Park , cartoons are an ever present part of American culture. We will discuss how this media creates and communicates stories, and how these stories often reflect and critique our contemporary culture. We will discover just how much more there is to cartoons than colorful visuals and easy to digest storylines. How do cartoons teach their audience? Why do they choose the messages they do? Who are these messages for, and why are they needed? Over the course of the term we will discuss the wide variety of answers to these questions, and we will begin to experiment with building our own messages for our own audiences.FI88097W, 4-5:15 & M, 4-4:50 (thru 10/13)Schumacher, AmandaCLASS
Career ConnectionsStudents will have the opportunity to explore how their interests, skills, and values relate to various careers and identify majors that fit with their personality. Through this course, students will take a variety of career assessments, research careers of interest, and begin implementing a four year career plan essential to success for the future.FJ88098T & Th, 5-5:50Rowell, AmyOther Faculty
American WaysThe United States is a large country and, with the exception of Native Americans, composed of immigrants and their descendants. So what do we mean by the term "American"? We will compare the United States to other cultures to identify American values and norms, and we will consider the different regional cultures in the U.S. to understand how history, language and geography create variations and even contradictions to national cultural values. Both US citizens and international students are encouraged to enroll.FKK89574W, 5:30-6:45 & M, 5:30-6:20 (thru 10/13)Lindsey, Peggy & Kelley RiffeCLASS
The Future of EnergyThe global challenge of fossil fuel replacement has no simple solution. Wind, solar, geothermal, nuclear, hydrogen, and others will be presented along with their corresponding promises, myths, limitations, and hopes. The relationship of future energy sources to daily living will be explored.FL88100T, 2-3:15 & Th, 2-2:50 (thru 10/9)Orvis, Jessica and Moneka JonesCOSM
Engineering ChallengesStudents will investigate the challenges that engineers face and solve by using new technologies, and they will learn the science and technology skills required to develop such solutions.FM88101T & Th, 8-8:50Molina, GustavoCEIT
Georgia in FocusThis course will examine a brief history of Georgia, beginning with the founding of the colony to current issues in the state including the economy, education, politics and where Georgia is headed. A deeper focus of "Georgia in Film" will also be explored in the course with several film viewings throughout the semester.FN88102M & W, 9:05-9:55Cross, LydiaCOE
American Sign Language and Deaf CultureThis section of FYE focuses on basic American Sign Language (ASL) as well as aspects of deaf culture. At the conclusion of the course, students will know conversational phrases in American Sign Language and what separates deaf American culture from hearing American culture. This course is taught by a university ASL interpreter.FO88103T & Th, 11-11:50Greenstein, RobynOther Faculty
Building Successful RelationshipsEstablishing and nurturing healthy interpersonal relationships is a great source of pleasure which, at times, can be painful.  Interpersonal relationships are especially important as you begin your college career because through them you develop your sense of personal identity and your world view.  This course will focus on the interpersonal communication skills that are necessary for developing and maintaining positive relationships.  Topics will include self-awareness, dealing with emotions, developing close relationships and managing interpersonal conflict.G85327M & W, 11:15-12:05Graham, BeverlyCLASS
Education around the WorldThis seminar will introduce students to classrooms in educational institutions in various countries that represent the majority population in the world. Students will have many opportunities to get involved in the discovery process about the relationship between education and sociocultural, political, and economic developments in those countries through reading books and articles, researching internet materials, and live conversations with international students and faculty. Students will enrich their knowledge and develop skills vital for living in their culturally inter-related world.GG85354M & W, 12:20-1:10Dmitriyev, GrigoryCOE
Video Game CultureIn his 2006 book, Gaming, Alex Galloway examines video game as a distinct cultural form that demands a new and unique interpretive framework. Following his example, we will examine how video games have helped narratives evolve, changed on-the-job training, and enhanced the way we communicate. By looking at a number of different game classifications, we will be able to see how this medium offers a new concept of culture and continues to lead the charge into the ever-expanding digital world. Since this seminar is designed to promote both your information literacy skills and your cognitive and affective integration into the University community, you will be asked to think about far more than just video games.H85328T & Th, 12:30-1:20Anderson, DustinCLASS
Video Game CultureIn his 2006 book, Gaming, Alex Galloway examines video game as a distinct cultural form that demands a new and unique interpretive framework. Following his example, we will examine how video games have helped narratives evolve, changed on-the-job training, and enhanced the way we communicate. By looking at a number of different game classifications, we will be able to see how this medium offers a new concept of culture and continues to lead the charge into the ever-expanding digital world. Since this seminar is designed to promote both your information literacy skills and your cognitive and affective integration into the University community, you will be asked to think about far more than just video games.HH85355T & Th, 2-2:50Anderson, DustinCLASS
Daring GreatlyCollege is full of many new experiences and great opportunities. Utilizing Brene Brown's research on vulnerability, embracing imperfection, and living wholeheartedly, this course will allow you to explore how having the courage to be vulnerable can greatly transform your college experience. From meeting new people to trying new things, students in the class will be challenged to step outside of their comfort zone and experience the impact "Daring Greatly" will have on their Georgia Southern Experience. To learn more about Brene Brown's research, please check out her TED talk at https://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_on_vulnerability.HHI86641M & W, 4 - 4:50Richard, AnniseOther Faculty
It's A Different World: Success Strategies for Making It In CollegeThe 90's television show, A Different World, focused on the lives of college students during that time period. This course will review some of the themes from A Different World and will discuss success strategies or tactics for today's college student to achieve their goals in the classroom and beyond.I85329T & Th, 5-5:50Smith, JoyyaOther Faculty
Life's Greatest LessonsThis course will use the book, Tuesdays With Morrie, to help students explore "life's greatest lessons." The class will discuss the concepts shared in the book such as love, money, regrets, family, and more. Those concepts will also be applied towards college and how to become a successful student at Georgia Southern.II85356M & W, 5:30-6:20Greenstein, KerryOther Faculty
Spain thru the Artists' EyesSpain thru the Artists’ Eyes provides students with the opportunity to learn about Spain’s culture and history as viewed through the eyes of many of Spain’s most well known artists. The course will address various historical periods, artists, creative practices, and themes.JC85444M & W, 9:05-9:55McGrath, MichaelCLASS
Money MattersWhether you have money or not, you need to understand how you can take control of your financial situation and plan for the future. This course will go over some basic principles of personal finances and teach some healthy financial skills all individuals need. You'll learn some practical skills in this course, such as how to balance your finances and how to invest in a 401(k).JJ85357T & Th, 9:30-10:20Melton, BridgetCHHS
Technology for LearningThe exponential rate by which technology is progressing has created multiple opportunities to share and consume information.  This course will explore how modern technologies such as social media, tablet PCs, educational gaming, wikis, blogs, and mobile phones are being used to enhance student learning and improve the quality of life when used appropriately.JJU85466T & Th, 11-11:50LaFrance, JasonCOE
Good GriefDeath and dying, grief and loss: these concepts are identified, explained, investigated and even applied by simulation activities and in-depth discussions of real-life experiences. Whether you have been the outsider or the insider when it comes to death and loss, we have much to teach each other on this much avoided but extremely essential topic. From the maturational losses experienced by every college freshmen to the disenfranchised losses experienced by others throughout their lives, this class brings it all to the forefront, with feelings of awkwardness to feelings of normalcy, and unique bonds that are sure to stick.JK85440M & W, 11:15-12:05Johnson, AbbyCLASS
Experience Matters: Co-Ops and InternshipsThis FYE 1220 course is designed to introduce students in engineering, information technology, computer science, construction management (or other majors where internships and co-ops are common) to the cooperative education (co-op) learning model. Students will explore careers topics and develop the strategies and skills necessary for effective participation in co-ops and internships. The course will cover the history and current trends in cooperative education; how to effectively search and apply for internship and co-op positions; and how to enhance professionalism in the workplace. Students will be given the opportunity to interact with industry representatives throughout the course.JL85441M & W, 12:20-1:10Gorman, AllisonOther Faculty
Reddit for CreditThis seminar will explore the functions, roles, and sense of self-definitions of web-based hybrid communities which incorporate elements of social media and link-sharing. While the most obvious of these is reddit, we will also look at other forms of online communities, based on nationalities, age, ethnicities, gender, and special interests. Connections between online personae and the self IRL, and how those vary from community to community, will also be addressed. Your work for the class will include becoming an active member of at least one online community.JU85455M & W, 2:30-3:20Pellegrino, JoeCLASS
Geeking OutTrekkies. Gleeks. Twihards. These aren't your average fans, casually viewing their favorite show once a week. In this class we will look at what drives certain fans to go beyond mere interest to actively participating in a fandom and becoming part of a unique subculture. Our discussions will include topics such as fanfiction, fanvids, cosplay, conventions, and online communities.JV85445W, 4-5:15 & M, 4-4:50 (thru 10/13)Douberly, Julie & Sammie LintonCLASS
Get to Know YourselfOne of the most common questions and concerns that modern-day college students have is: What do I want to be when I graduate? This is an excellent question, and one to be answered. However, too many students forget to ask one of the most important questions of all: Who am I? The experience of attending college is perhaps the most effective tool for finding the answer to such a critical question. This course will examine trends and characteristics of the contemporary college student by focusing on well-known student development theories.JX85443T & Th, 5-5:50Pollett, JasonOther Faculty
Being Successful in CollegeWelcome to college! As you navigate this new journey, there are sure to be many challenges along the way. However, there are many ways to help ensure a positive college experience! This course will explore strategies for success and focus on helping students make the most of their time at Georgia Southern.JZ85442M & W, 5:30-6:20Tyson, JennaCOSM
Athletic CoachingThis course addresses the mental and emotional challenges of teaching student athletes and managing a sports program. It explores the roles of a head coach, the qualities a coach should possess, relationships with the administration and other faculty, the recruiting process, off-season planning and final preparation for the season.KK85358W, 8-9:40Zwald, DrewCHHS
The Naked RoommateThis section will explore the exciting and not-so-exciting moments students will encounter as a college freshmen.LL85359M & W, 9:05-9:55Buck, LaurenOther Faculty
Financial Stability in College and BeyondToday’s college students graduate with a larger amount of indebtedness for student loans, credit cards, and car payments than any previous generation of college graduates. Is anyone to blame for this? Students' reckless spending? Parents' failure to plan? Governments' misguided priorities? In this course section, we will consider these issues as well as focus on personal financial budgeting and planning skills for today’s college students. Students will discuss personal financial budgeting and planning skills as well as personal investment, financial savings, and lifelong issues of retirement investment and financial planning.LLL86605T & Th, 9:30-10:20Beebe Novotny, TheresaOther Faculty
Education and the American DreamOur parents, schools and communities work hard to educate us. We in turn use this education to leave our mark in the world as we hope to make this world our "American dream." During your first semester we will look at our educators, our future aspirations and the potential barriers to our plans.LU85463T & Th, 11-11:50Thompson, ChristinaCOE
Incest, Poison, and Murder: Demystifying the Borgias, Renaissance Italy’s Most Infamous FamilyThe Borgias are known as one of the most notorious Renaissance families in Italy. History has seen them as highly unsavory characters, and simply mentioning the name within the walls of the Vatican could bring chills. Popular movies, novels, TV shows, and even video games have featured one or more of the infamous family members who are usually cast as villainous in nature. More often than not, murder, poison, greed, treachery, and lust feature strongly in representations of the family. But how accurate are these portrayals, and how much truth actually lies within these so-called black legends which have become so prevalent in popular culture? Learn more about these stories and the actual historical facts surrounding the house of Borgia and their rise to infamy. In this course we will learn about members of the Borgia family and compare popular culture to that of actual historical accounts, and also how to accurately evaluate sources about historic people and events.MM85360M & W, 12:20-1:10Jackson, KatrinaOther Faculty
Tax Fraud: Ethics & Case StudiesThis course explores U.S. tax fraud, from individual fraud to large scale corporate. The course will begin with an introduction to the U.S. legal system and will then progress to a discussion of general principles of ethics, criminal law in the U.S. and the law of fraud. A number of laws governing fraud generally and tax fraud specifically will be covered. The latter half of the course will involve case studies in tax fraud.N85335T & Th, 12:30-1:20Wiggins, MichaelOther Faculty
Self-LeadershipCharacter is shaped by personal core values. Effective leaders understand their values and live and lead from those values. In this course, you will explore and clarify your core values as you begin your leadership journey. Then, you will learn to rely on your core values, as well as ethical considerations, to guide your decision-making as you develop your personal leadership style and your skills as a leader.O85336M & W, 2:30-3:20Deal, ToddCOSM
Technology for LearningThe exponential rate by which technology is progressing has created multiple opportunities to share and consume information.  This course will explore how modern technologies such as social media, tablet PCs, educational gaming, wikis, blogs, and mobile phones are being used to enhance student learning and improve the quality of life when used appropriately.OO85361M & W, 4-4:50LaFrance, DianeCOE
Latino Traditions and CultureThrough the study of several sources with different perspectives, participants will understand the Latin American context from the viewpoints of culture, politics, economics and art. At the end of the course, students will have the opportunity to apply their new knowledge to understand the new role of Latin America in the 21st century.P85337T, 5-6:40Cobos, AlbaOther Faculty
The Value of College Athletics in Higher EducationExplore the value of higher education and whether college athletics enhances that value. Likewise, explore the many issues facing higher education and college athletics. Finally, engage in a review and discussion of the mission statements of various colleges and explore if college athletics enhances those mission statements. Topics will include college cost, NCAA governance, scandals in college athletics, and the business side of college athletics.PP85362M & W, 5:30-6:20Roughton, KeithOther Faculty
Winning at MathFor many students math is one of the most difficult subjects in college. Every student must pass at least one math course to graduate. Many students are intimidated by math due to a variety of reasons. However, math is the "critical filter" for education. The more math you have had, the more job opportunities you will have. Math anxiety is an emotional or physical response to taking math courses or any math-related situation. Math anxiety is a learned behavior and can be unlearned! A student who is anxious about a test or about math in general is focusing attention on himself and his uncomfortable feelings instead of directing his attention on learning the concept or completing the course. Methods to overcome math-anxious feelings will be investigated.PPP86607T & Th, 9:30-10:20Winskie, AmyCOSM
Autobiography of Malcolm XThe Autobiography of Malcolm X was published in 1965, the result of a collaboration between human rights activist Malcolm X and journalist Alex Haley. Haley coauthored the autobiography based on a series of in-depth interviews he conducted between 1963 and Malcolm X's 1965 assassination. The autobiography is a spiritual conversion narrative that outlines Malcolm X's philosophy of black pride, black nationalism, and pan-Africanism. After the death of his subject, Haley authored the book's epilogue, which describes their collaboration and summarizes the end of Malcolm X's life. This subject will explore different perspectives of social justice and equality.Q85338M & W, 10:10-11Pugh, ChristopherOther Faculty
Logic and ParadoxesThe basic principles that constitute the foundation and logical coherence of human reasoning have been seriously challenged by both philosophy and the mathematical sciences on more than one occasion. These challenges are often called “paradoxes,” and they indicate that some of the most deeply ingrained and widely accepted principles of human reasoning, such as certain ideas on which arithmetic is founded, are fragile and certainly worth questioning. In this course we shall examine a number of these problems, including their origins and implications, as well as possible solutions to these conundrums. This is not a course about religion; rather, this is a course about certain serious conceptual problems that serve to show that the conventional abstract sciences are only inches away from disaster. Moreover, this course presupposes no background beyond elementary arithmetic. All other methods and concepts are explained from scratch.QQ85363T & Th, 11-11:50Higgerson, RobertCLASS
Education around the WorldThis seminar will introduce students to classrooms in educational institutions in various countries that represent the majority population in the world. Students will have many opportunities to get involved in the discovery process about the relationship between education and sociocultural, political, and economic developments in those countries through reading books and articles, researching internet materials, and live conversations with international students and faculty. Students will enrich their knowledge and develop skills vital for living in their culturally inter-related world.R85339M & W, 11:15-12:05Dmitriyev, GrigoryCOE
Hispanic Culture through FilmThis course will provide the opportunity to view, analyze and discuss the main trends and issues in a variety of Hispanic films, allowing for students to heighten their awareness and deepen their knowledge of Hispanic cultures. Topics include reconstructing the past, genre-specific studies, gender and sexuality, and nationalist identities.RR85364M & W, 12:20-1:10McGrath, LeticiaCLASS
American Fiction and ChangeFiction is a mirror reflecting the rapidly changing face of American culture. This course will explore the many societal changes that America has undergone and how those shifting scenes are brought to life in creative writing, from the myriad views of war and economic change to those regional and cultural differences celebrated by our unique blend of people. Like the railroad, fiction, popularized in affordable magazines, helped link together America's vast and various regions. In addition to the focus on cultural revolutions, this course will also consider the impact of change on those who undergo both subtle and sudden shifts as characters attempt to deal with a variety of crises. Most importantly, such transformations and their impact can be particularly helpful in coming to terms with the forces of change in our own lives.S85375T, 12:30-1:45 & Th, 12:30-1:20 (thru 10/9)Edenfield, Olivia & LaTanya Atwell-CooneyCLASS
Can You Dig it? Creating Your Own Mystery for Your College LifeIn the short young adult novel called Holes, author Louis Sachar shows the lead character, Stanley Yelnats, taking charge of his life by deciding his own reasons for the digging of holes he’s initially been commanded to undertake at camp. This character is steeped in excitement; this is because he creates his own power and mystery, transforming an “assignment” into a creative act he designs, by his own hard work, to be the very mystery he needs to solve in order to become more himself. This character is our inspiration for FYE, as we read the novel in question, all while working with academic discourse and how it can help you decide how you want to create your own unique college mystery.SS85365W, 2:30-3:45 & M, 2:30-3:20 (thru 10/13)Olson, Christina & Nigel RichardsonCLASS
Understanding the Human Body: Get ready for AP!This course is intended to increase the understanding of the structure and function of the human body and will help students to prepare for taking the Human Anatomy and Physiology course required for all allied health majors, such as nursing, exercise science, athletic training and nutrition. The course will cover basic study skills, math skills, anatomical terminology, basic chemistry, cell biology, and other basics of the human body.T85341T & Th, 3:30-4:20Sturges, DianaCHHS
Athletic CoachingThis course addresses the mental and emotional challenges of teaching student athletes and managing a sports program. It explores the roles of a head coach, the qualities a coach should possess, relationships with the administration and other faculty, the recruiting process, off-season planning and final preparation for the season.U85342W, 4-5:40Zwald, DrewCHHS
Battle of the Sexes: Representations of Men and Women in Visual CultureRomantic versus action movies. Barbie dolls versus Hot Wheels. Cosmopolitan versus GQ. Although these are inanimate objects, you most likely have assigned a gender to them. In other words, these represent female versus male products. Throughout our lives, we are bombarded with images that represent how women and men should appear and behave. These images reflect and shape our views of gender, specifically the dichotomy of masculinity and femininity. In this course, we will explore the construction of gender by analyzing images in fine art, film, magazines, advertisements, music videos, etc.UU85367T & Th, 5-5:50Lowery, AshleyOther Faculty
Math Goes to HollywoodMath in the movies and television can be informative, interesting, humorous, and integral to the plot. We will examine many instances of math in Hollywood, such as Cast Away, Numb3rs, Die Hard with a Vengeance, The Wizard of Oz, and October Sky. We will then study the intricacies behind these concepts.VV85368M & W, 12:20-1:10Yocco, LisaCOSM
First-Generation College StudentsFirst-generation college students face a unique set of challenges. College may seem like a foreign land where people speak a foreign language. This course will offer tools, skills, experiences, and new knowledge that will set a foundation for success for students who are the first of their family to succeed in higher education. We will explore barriers to success, financial literacy, campus resources, and strategies for bringing family members along for this journey. Students will leave this experience with a plan for success in college and beyond.VVV86620M & W, 10:10-11Jackson, PatriceOther Faculty
BaseballEven before baseball was popular, Walt Whitman called baseball America's pastime. We will look at four eras of baseball: the Chicago cubs and the dead ball era, the St. Louis cardinals and the depression, the 1950s and the Brooklyn dodgers, and the Oakland A's and moneyball. We will also watch Ken Burns' documentary on baseball. If weather permits, we should fittingly end the semester with our own game.W85344T, 11-12:15 & Th, 11-11:50 (thru 10/9)Weaver, John & Daniel OdomCOE
Communication and CultureStudents will learn about and experience human communication in an intercultural context.WW85369W, 4-5:40Kennerly, RebeccaCLASS
Pirates in FilmThe course will examine how pirates are portrayed by Hollywood in comparison to what is known about real pirates during the golden age of piracy.X85345T & Th, 12:30-1:20Smith, SolomonCLASS
The History & Traditions of Georgia SouthernDo you know the legend of Beautiful Eagle Creek? How did Sweetheart Circle get its name? What year was our school founded? Who was the first president of our school? Come learn the answers to these questions and many more as we read and learn about the history and traditions of Georgia Southern University.Y85346M & W, 5:30-6:20O'Brien, JanetOther Faculty
The Last Lecture: Leaving a Lasting Legacy at Georgia SouthernThe course will use Randy Pausch's book The Last Lecture to explore what it means to leave a lasting legacy. Students will learn about opportunities at Georgia Southern and apply Pausch's message to themselves and what kind of legacy they would like to leave at Georgia Southern.YA85435M & W, 10:10-11Cantor, JulieOther Faculty
Money Matters 101Getting started on the right financial foot at the beginning of college is critical for a lifetime of financial security. This course will focus on how to make smart personal money decisions including cash flow, budgeting, and avoiding debt. Get control of your personal finances early in your young adulthood. Learn easy, fun principles of handling money and you will discover that Money Matters.YB85436T & Th, 2-2:50Bland, HelenOther Faculty
Modern Political DebateThis seminar is intended for students who enjoy investigating and discussing contemporary political issues. We'll seek to be passionate in defense of our positions, rigorous in our use of evidence and civil in our interactions with each other. Students will choose their primary issue to research for the semester and work in teams to debate their positions.YY85371T & Th, 3:30-4:20Caplinger, ChrisCLASS
Making Maps MoveWilliam Blake once wrote that one can "see the world in a grain of sand." This course will examine the history of maps and mapping, from the very small to the very large. It will mine the resources in Denis Wood's Everything Sings: Maps for a Narrative Atlas and Patricia Seed's Oxford Map Companion: One Hundred Sources in World History as well as the classic work of Edward Tufte to create very personal projects based on family and narrative along with very global projects related to 100 of the most significant maps in world history. Projects envisioned include posters, a Google Fusion Table map, and a final project option of either a pan-and-scan DVD/Youtube film or Prezi-style presentation using motion graphics.YYY86040T, 3:30-4:45 & Th, 3:30-4:20 (thru 10/9)Batchelor, Robert & Haley McKenzieCLASS
Humans, Robots and EthicsThis course will provide students with the ability to recognize and confront potential ethical issues and social responsibilities of scientists and engineers. In particular, students will analyze ethical issues related to robot-human interaction.Z85347T & Th, 3:30-4:20Alba-Flores, RocioCEIT
Horror CinemaHow did we get from Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960) to James Wan's Saw (2004)? from George Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968) to Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later (2002)? This course explores influential films in the horror genre and examines the cinematic, cultural, and historical reasons for their mainstream appeal.ZZ85372T, 5-6:15 & Th, 5-5:50 (thru 10/9)Kluge, Stacy & Kendria LeeOther Faculty
Horror CinemaHow did we get from Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960) to James Wan's Saw (2004)? from George Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968) to Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later (2002)? This course explores influential films in the horror genre and examines the cinematic, cultural, and historical reasons for their mainstream appeal.ZZA85370W, 5:30-6:45 & M, 5:30-6:20 (thru 10/13)Kluge, Stacy & Anslee HaganOther Faculty

Last updated: 2/2/2016

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