Continuing Education
Georgia Southern University

NYAR Conference – Schedule at a Glance

Conference Links

 

Click each day to see the full schedule.

Sunday

March 4, 2018
1:00pm Registration Opens
Exhibitors Available in Balcony & Lobby Areas
2:30–5:30pm

Pre-Conference Workshops*

*Pre-conference workshops are $75.
See fees here.

Steve Parese – “Calm Down!” Crisis Management Skills for Educators of At-Risk Youth

Session Description

Staff who work with challenging youth are often called upon to handle a wide range of confusing and frustrating behavior problem. It can be tempting to react to all misbehavior with strict discipline, but a “one size fits all” approach is often ineffective and alienates students with whom we must build helping relationships.
During this practical, highly interactive 3-hour pre-conference workshop with author and international speaker Dr. Steve Parese, you will:
1. Discuss a logical decision-making model for responding to three different types of problems.
2. Explore interventions with deliberately misbehaving youth.
3. Examine the impact of high stress, low self-esteem, and prior trauma on emotional misbehavior with youth.
4. Identify four predictable phases of an escalating crisis, including specific strategies for each phase.
5. Practice three levels of active listening de-escalating emotional youth.
Hotep – Addressing the Poverty Mindset

Session Description

While many use the words poor and poverty synonymously, they are very different. Poor is a financial condition of having little money. However, poverty is a mindset; a system of beliefs, attitudes, and perspectives. Schools that serve low-income communities tend to face similar and pervasive issues that are actually a result of a poverty mindset. This workshop clarifies what true poverty is, why it exists, how it secretly impacts our schools, and, most importantly, what we can do to change it permanently!
6:00pm Jazz Ensemble, Atlantic Coast High School, Jacksonville, FL – Mr. Whalen, Director
6:00–8:30pm

Keynote Banquet* Speaker: Stedman Graham

MC: Dan Rea, Introducer: Dr. Paul Brooksher

Identity Leadership, A Roadmap to Professional Success

Identity leadership is based on the philosophy that individuals hold the power to their personal and professional success as educators of youth. It begins with the understanding that to lead others, you must first be able to lead your ‘self.’  Participants learn the principles of identity leadership through The Nine Step Success Process®, which provides a roadmap to realizing your maximum potential and performance for leading and teaching youth placed at risk.

*If you are not paying the full conference fee, dinner is $65.
See fees here.

Monday

March 5, 2018
7:30am Registration Opens
7:30–8:30am Continental Breakfast
8:00am Exhibits Open
8:30–10:00am

Keynote Presentation: Principal Baruti Kafele

MC: Ja Hon Vance, Introducer: Dr. Ann Levett, Supt. Sav./Chatham Schools

Closing the Attitude Gap: How to Fire Up Your Students for Excellence

Principal Kafele asserts that a huge challenge to closing the various gaps in achievement is the assumption that achievement is the only issue of concern for educators. Going beyond a superficial treatment of achievement, he contends that underachievement is a result of the failure to adequately address the attitude gap that continues to persist in American classrooms. He makes this assertion for students across racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines. Educators will learn practical strategies for closing the attitude gap and firing up their students to eliminate underachievement in their classrooms and schools.

High Flying Schools Presentation

Dr. Tom Koballa to present awards

10:30–11:45am Session 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Parese

What’s in YOUR Wallet? Resisting the Lure of Angry Power Struggles with Challenging Youth.

Session Description

Troubled children and youth often push problems to the limits, and are expert at pushing buttons on staff as well. As educators and support staff, we may sometimes find ourselves taking problems too personally, needlessly escalating problems. In this eye-opening workshop with Dr. Steve Parese, we first examine the dynamics of power struggles, then explore five distinct sources of adult anger. Next, we discuss four self-defeating dynamics with youth, and expose specific reasons why some of these patterns may be more difficult to manage than others. Finally, we discuss strategies and insights essential to maintaining a professional perspective in challenging situations.

Wesley Montoya

Traditional Approaches to Hispanic Academic Success

Session Description

Present participants with strategies that discuss the cultural traditions that Hispanic families often follow in order to teach their children, discuss how to build relationships with Hispanic students and their families, discuss how to provide a family like atmosphere in school, discuss how to challenge and assist Hispanic students by allowing for the process of discovery on their own to help them grow academically.

Lesley Roessing

Mirrors & Maps: Using Young Adult Literature to Navigate Risks & Challenges in Adolescent Life

Session Description

Young Adult literature allows adolescents to mirror themselves in books, safely discussing and working through problems in their lives through conversations about how characters handle/mishandle problems. Novels can provide maps to navigate risks and challenges experienced in adolescent life. The presenter, a former middle-grades teacher and author of No More “Us” and “Them,” teaches Bibliotherapy and will share the newest YA novels/memoirs that reflect contemporary adolescent lives and help readers work though challenges. Participants will be led through strategies and activities that generate conversations about issues adolescents face and help young readers discover alternatives to dealing with risks.

Ahmand Tinker and William Silveri – Implementing a 5th Quarter Program for At-Risk Student Athletes

Getting Them to the 3E’s – Enrolled, Enlisted or Employed!

Session Description

The primary focus and design of the program is to have the student athletes who participate in the school’s athletic academic support program be prepared and equipped to enroll in college, enlist in the military, or be gainfully employed after high school; simply known as the 3E’s.

Tabathia Baldy

Interventions that Work: Literacy Interventions for Grades 6 – 12

Session Description

In this interactive session, participants will learn three evidence-based literacy strategies/interventions that are free, easy to implement, and are currently being used successfully in grades 6 – 12 in a Title I school district in rural South Georgia. Participants will leave with the skills to implement these strategies immediately in their own classrooms
Principal Baruti Kafele, Q & A
High Flying Schools Presentation

Carmen Long

Growth Mindset – The answer to “Why do I need to know this?

Session Description

Motivating students is a challenge to most educators at some point or another. Students deserve to know why they are being asked to learn concepts or produce evidence that learning has occurred. They are often given empty reasons like, “we must review the standards based curriculum” or “it is on the test”. These answers are not motivating to a student. The answer to the question” Why do I need to know this?” is powerful when the answer provides relevant truth about skills students need to have in order to succeed after high school is over.

Dr. Abbigail Armstrong

Instructional Strategies Impacting ‘At-Risk’ Learners

Session Description

In this session, participants will discuss and practice strategies that effectively impact at-risk students by helping them learn at higher levels of cognitive demand and to be independent thinkers so they will achieve academically. The instructional practices shared will help increase student engagement and rigor and will challenge learners at risk while fostering a supportive learning environment so they meet high expectations and experience success.

Aviva Goelman Rice

Creating and Sustaining a Positive Learning Environment for Students at Risk

Session Description

This fast-paced session will help participants uncover the often overlooked structures of the classroom environment that can negatively affect the achievement of students at risk.  Teachers will take away multiple strategies that can increase the engagement and cooperation of students who are at greatest risk for school failure.  With concrete examples and evidence-based strategies, this session will support educators who want their classrooms to become learning communities that are inclusive of all students.

JáHon Vance

Closing the Achievement Gap for Males of Color

Session Description

This presentation focuses on contemporary educational frameworks used to understand instructional quality, student engagement, youth development, parenting, and leadership in racially diverse communities. The presenter shares guiding principles and practices that have led to males of color achieving academic success in the classroom. Educators will learn how to raise achievement levels for males of color, while narrowing the gaps between groups, by increasing community, teacher, student, and family engagement in the learning process.

Anthony Outler

Stop Beating Around The Bush And Get to the Root! An Examination of How Racist and Classist Structures Produce “At-Riskness” for Poor Students of Color

Session Description

It is no mystery that statistics related to school failure, suspension rates, dropout rates and every other indicator used to identify youth at-risk reveal that poor students of color are disproportionately represented. In spite of legislation, school reforms, intervention programs, etc. these statistics remain the same, or worsen, year after year. This is due to a reluctance to address the root of the problem. How can we truly remedy the epidemic of “youth at-risk” if we do not recognize, critique and dismantle the systemic classist and racist structures that perpetuate “at-riskness” for poor students of color? In this session, we will examine the forces that reproduce inequities and discuss strategies for empowering ourselves, our students, schools and organizations to be champions for social justice.

John O. Nwosu, Ed.S.

“Where is Waldo?” Challenging our Approach to Equity

Session Description

How are Waldo and equity related? “Where is Waldo?” presupposes that Waldo exists. We tend to assume the opposite when it comes to bias and discrimination. We want to believe that “those things” don’t happen “here” even in the face of disparate outcomes. In this experiential session participants will explore topics designed to reduce discrimination: updates in multicultural and social justice counseling competencies, implicit and explicit bias research, structural marginalization, and tools for increasing equity.

Strand I

HEAD

Natalie S. King, Ph.D.

I AM STEM: Starting Your STEM Program from the Ground Up!

Session Description

In this presentation, I share the I AM STEM model for designing and implementing high-quality STEM programs from the ground up. Attendees will learn how to successfully leverage community and university resources to engage children in culturally-relevant and innovative STEM curricula. This interactive session will benefit executive directors, administrators, curriculum developers, STEM educators, and practitioners or researchers engaged in broadening participation efforts.

Strand II

HEART

Dr. Beverly Smith, LPC, CCMHC, NCC, ACS

Psychological First Aid

Session Description

Psychological First Aid for the school community is needed to assist in promoting good mental healthcare and to increase awareness for removing barriers to mental health services. An increased awareness of mental health issues promotes empathy, helps in removing stigmas, and increases appropriate responses in a crisis or non-crisis situation. Research indicates the need for community care of mental health concerns for healthy outcomes for the individuals, schools, families, and all other stakeholders. Within the school community, students and adults struggle with mental health issues in silence across the country. This session will discuss “Psychological First Aid for the School Community.” The purpose of this session includes (1) increasing the awareness of mental health issues within the school community, (2) increasing the awareseness for self and community advocacy, (3) becoming a trauma responsivenes school community, and (4) addressing barriers that promote stigmas to enhance guidelines for best practices. Additionally, this session will promote resiliency, well-being, and wholeness by presenting strategies for self-care and self-compassion within an urban school community setting.

Strand III

HANDS

Edward J. Sabornie, Ph.D.

Preventing Violence and Ensuring Safety in North Carolina Schools: A Statewide Analysis

Session Description

This presentation will discuss a study that examined charter versus traditional public schools’ crime, violence, and safety in every school in North Carolina (n = 2,595) during the 2015-2016 school year. The dependent variables in the study were specific recorded acts of student crime and violence (n = 16) committed at school (e.g., assault on school personnel, possession of a controlled substance). Results showed significantly lower rates of crime and violence existed in charter versus traditional public schools. Study characteristics, additional findings, and implications of the results will be discussed.

Strand IV

HEALTH

Dr. Adair F. White-Johnson

“21 Ways to Get Over It!” Using a Trauma Informed Approach to Help Teens Become Effective Leaders in their Lives

Session Description

The purpose of this session will be to share an evidence-based program that focuses on teaching middle and high school students cope with traumatic events and “setbacks” in their lives. The objective is to share strategies that will help the participants create programs that will increase the self-esteem levels of the students, reduce feelings of defeat and insignificance and move the students toward positive changes in their lives. This session is perfect for middle and high school educators.

Strand V

HOME

Bea Lewis

Conversation Techniques for Difficult Parents, Students, Teachers and Administrators

Session Description

Conferences can be difficult when the individuals involved have challenging personalities. Attendees will be introduced to difficult student, parent, teacher/administrator personalities that can take a simple discussion into a battle of wills and non-productivity. Presentation includes indicators and strategies to use to take control of conference from beginning to conclusion with positive outcomes. This presentation is “real talk”, interactive, and entertaining and will provide ideas that can readily be applied into any school conference situation.
11:45am–1:15pm Lunch on Your Own
Click here to see where conference attendees can get discounts in Savannah.
1:15–2:30pm Session 2

Daryl Macaluso

Signs and Solutions, Addressing Gang Activity in Schools

Session Description

You have an interest in serving “at-risk” or gang related kids! This program was specifically designed for school professionals, law enforcement, and parents involved in or interested in school safety. Participants will gain insight into the criminal gang culture. This presentation contains graphic images of gang violence and strong language

Frank Kros

Change Your Language, Change Their Lives

Session Description

Neuroscience discoveries have revolutionized our understanding of how the brains of our children learn and grow. In particular, brain research reveals how the specific language used by adults who teach, mentor, counsel and parent youth has a much more profound effect on their development than previously realized. Walk away with a new way of talking to youth that builds resilience, promotes intrinsic motivation, enhances cognitive stimulation and creates kaleidoscope thinkers. What you say matters, more than you ever knew!

Cynthia L. Morton, Antoinette L. Dunstan, Candice Anderson and Monica Seeley

Why Peer Intervention is Viable

Session Description

Welcome to the “Age of Indifference”. Unfortunately, our culture is so busy looking at our own problems and issues that we have systematically stopped caring about others. However, if our culture would embrace a system based on collaboration and compassion, we may lessen many social and psychological issues that impact youth today.

Lacey Ray

The Effects of Transition Programs on the Return to the Community from Residential Juvenile Justice Placement 

Session Description

This presentation is literature review of 25 studies evaluating the transitional process from correctional placement into the community by youth ages 10-22. The review emphasizes the connections between engagement, service dosage, academic and vocational training and recidivism, and barriers to reentry with a focus on implications for practitioners

Cordelia Zinskie and Dan Rea 

National Youth-At-Risk Journal: Overview and Opportunities 

Session Description

Cordelia Zinskie, Chief Editor, Professor of Educational Research, and Dan Rea, Conference Co-Chair and Founding Editor, Professor of Educational Psychology, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA

The National Youth-At-Risk Journal, sponsored by the College of Education at Georgia Southern University, is a publishing outlet where both researchers and practitioners can learn about and share information regarding youth placed at risk. Editors will provide an overview of the journal, highlight recent issues, and share tips on how to get published. As part of this interactive session, attendees are encouraged to ask questions and/or describe ideas regarding possible journal submissions.

John Vandenburgh

Safe Schools: Addressing Racism, Harassment, Bias and Bullying Through a Youth Development Lens

Session Description

This workshop will examine how a network of students, staff, parents and community members can strategically come together to develop activities that address School Climate and the prevention of racism, harassment, bullying, and other acts of school violence. Participants will learn the latest youth development research and trends impacting our school climate and the importance of planning accordingly to these youth trends when developing Safe School Plans.

Chang’aa Mweti

The Power of Storytelling: Five Educational Concepts Embraced Through Storytelling

Session Description

Motivating stories enkindle longing hearts. Stories thaw out frozen brains getting the creative juices flowing and transform cold academic concepts into warm invitations to learning, hence making abstract concepts into concrete. Every teacher is a storyteller! Learn tips and techniques on using storytelling in the classroom, including how to sneak it through the backdoor to make learning fun! Examine ways in which stories can illustrate and reinforce concepts and through listening and retelling, improve students’ oral skills.

Patrick Phillips

The Intentional Student: Strategies to Help Students of Low-Socioeconomic Status Succeed at Post-Secondary Institutions

Session Description

The Intentional Student: Strategies to Help Students of Low Socioeconomic Status Succeed at Post-Secondary Institutions, is structured in three phases: The Prerequisites, The Process and The Exodus. Attendees will take a journey in the same manner students navigate the college experience. (The Prerequisites)-areas that are completed and mastered before college, (The Process)-tasks and areas that are mastered while in college and (The Exodus)-areas mastered upon conclusion of college to obtain gainful employment. The target audience is educators, school counselors, mentors, therapist, and school social workers.

Jeremiah Hopes, LPC, CAADC

I Can Stop Anytime I Want To BUT I Just Don’t Want To Substance Abuse Education and Treatment for Resistant Youth

Session Description

Drug use and abuse among our nation’s youth continues to present major concerns. Despite our best efforts, illicit drug markets continue to grow, young people continue to poison their brains and bodies and new synthetic and designer drugs continue to emerge from the lab to the lives of youth. This presentation will present innovative approaches and best practice methods to help educate and treat youth who are highly resistant to substance abuse services. Also, this presentation will present key strategies to quickly and effective connect with resistant youth and build a strong therapeutic alliance.

Reggie Carruth

Engaging Students Through Instructional Games

Session Description

Teachers will be given creative tips and tools to learn how to engage youth-at-risk through instructional games. Students will enjoy exploring hands-on activities that takes from everyday games and lessons by fusing and transforming them into meaningful collaborative grouping exercises.

Hotep

Behavior is a Symptom…Not the Problem: Getting to the Root

Session Description

Behavior is a Symptom demystifies the common behavior problems exhibited in schools by first explaining WHY they occur and the teaching HOW to change them. This workshop will: share the precursors that lead to all behavior, inform on how to transform academic and behavioral outcomes, explain what leads to at-risk behaviors and why people repeat the same negative behaviors and demonstrate how relevance and relationships impact behavior. In the end, attendees will be introduced to what is being called “The New PBIS”!

Anthony Outler

Moderator, Town Hall

John Hobe

Why Use Norm-Referenced Standardized Tests to Answer: Did I Teach? Did They Learn?

Session Description

If it state law that students must attend school or be home schooled until they are a certain age, then must the state protect them while at public schools? The answer seems self-evident. Indeed, the United States Constitution’s 14th Amendment guarantees equal protection under the laws to its citizens. But do school practices unintentionally violate this protection? I will focus on two possibilities: Norm referenced standardized tests (NRSTs) may fail accurately explaining student competence. The instructional alignment construct explains if we align instruction and assessment conditions our assessment accurately explain if we taught and the students learned. The NRST insults the instructional alignment construct.

Strand I

HEAD

Dr. Stephanie Leggett

Motivate My Mindset: Teachers, Parents and Students Setting Their Minds on Achievement, Growth and Excellence!

Session Description

We have heard that the ‘mind is a terrible thing to waste’. This session supports where the ‘Mind is set Matters Most!’ Activities and strategies that K-12 teachers and parents can implement will aid a diverse student population to have growth mindsets that are set for A.G.E. – Achievement, Growth, and Excellence despite the subject or task.

 Strand II

HEART

Helen Webster, Norman L. Coleman, Beth Hester

The Beacon in Our Journey: Next Stop: From Student Voice to Student Action

Session Description

Is it possible to reduce the achievement gap simply by implementing effective instructional practices? Francis Scott Key Middle School in Montgomery County Maryland has learned that building the cultural proficiency of teachers goes beyond classroom practices. The school’s Student Voice Project has transformed ideas about instruction by empowering students’ voices and investing in the infinite power of students’ actions.

Strand III

HANDS

Taylor Teichman

From Roadblocks to Bridges

Session Description

The intersection of sexual violence faced by LGBTQ youth who struggle with stable housing is one that is often overlooked. This workshop will educate youth allies on the ways in which this combination creates vulnerability for youth and how we can provide holistic, community-supported services.

Strand IV

HEALTH

Meghan W. Diamon

ACT To Save a Life: Implementing an Evidence-based Suicide Prevention Program

Session Description

Youth suicide is a preventable tragedy that can occur when children’s mental health needs are unmet. Participants will discuss published research on risk factors for youth suicide, how to implement an evidence-based prevention program, and how to tackle common obstacles encountered. Participants will be prepared to mobilize school staff, parents, and community members to address the critical issues of depression awareness and suicide prevention.

Strand V

HOME

Jim Taylor, Briana Burney, Kianna Reid, and Derrielle Brown

Working With Kids At Risk and Making a Difference, On The Street

Session Description

We know that kids living in poverty are 4 times more likely to drop out of school and 5 times more likely to go to jail; let’s change those odds. Georgia Southern University’s The 100 Collegiate Women of America are doing just that. Through mentorship programs in the projects to meaningful relationships with kids at risk in the school, homework to community outings, change is happening in Statesboro. This presentation will share briefly their mission, goals and objectives, though will focus on what it takes to develop an effective mentoring program, how meaningful relationships are developed, how to build partnerships with schools and how to increase academic success with kids at risk.
3:00–4:15pm Session 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daryl Macaluso

Signs and Solutions, Addressing Gang Activity in Schools

Session Description

You have an interest in serving “at-risk” or gang related kids! This program was specifically designed for school professionals, law enforcement, and parents involved in or interested in school safety. Participants will gain insight into the criminal gang culture. This presentation contains graphic images of gang violence and strong language

Frank Kros

Change Your Language, Change Their Lives

Session Description

Neuroscience discoveries have revolutionized our understanding of how the brains of our children learn and grow. In particular, brain research reveals how the specific language used by adults who teach, mentor, counsel and parent youth has a much more profound effect on their development than previously realized. Walk away with a new way of talking to youth that builds resilience, promotes intrinsic motivation, enhances cognitive stimulation and creates kaleidoscope thinkers. What you say matters, more than you ever knew!

Patti Huffman and Mary Ashby, Principal

Reviving Realistic Dreams: What a High School Diploma Does for Youth At Risk

Session Description

This non-traditional high school empowers youth at risk to earn a high school diploma as well as revive their dreams that await them beyond high school. Learn what tools and strategies have engendered hope and restored dreams in youths and adults alike. This school welcomes youth at risk and inspires cohorts to graduate college/career ready on time. By fostering a sense of belonging, safety, success, and hope, “can’t” is transformed into “can” as students realize their dreams.

Dr. Kimberly Mack and Pamela Knox, M.Ed.

Promoting Resilience and Community in a High-Poverty Urban School

Session Description

The presenters will share with school teachers, counselors, and administrators 1.) definitions of terms (community learning center, developmental assets, strength-based characteristics, and growth mindset) as well as its application in an urban schooling context, 2.) strategies to promote “grit” to increase student achievement among elementary-aged students, and 3.) field-tested actions to infuse resilience in a thriving school community.

Bonnie Springer and Andrea Criste, M.Ed.

Trust Building Tools for Talking with Youth During Times of Conflict

Session Description

This presentation will provide tools and strategies for turning crisis into opportunity. The skills of Life Space Crisis Intervention provide helping adults faced with the extreme behavior of youth during times of crisis strategies which build trust and connections in meaningful and healing ways; turning crisis into opportunity for at risk youth to develop social responsibility and grow emotionally.

John Vandenburgh

Safe Schools: Addressing Racism, Harassment, Bias and Bullying Through a Youth Development Lens

Session Description

This workshop will examine how a network of students, staff, parents and community members can strategically come together to develop activities that address School Climate and the prevention of racism, harassment, bullying, and other acts of school violence. Participants will learn the latest youth development research and trends impacting our school climate and the importance of planning accordingly to these youth trends when developing Safe School Plans.

Jeff Dane

Transforming High Risk Classrooms

Session Description

Do you want to transform your classroom with ready to use structures that support growth mindset, peer relationships, and psychological resilience? We will look at four ways to support mindset, and a dozen ways to build resiliency. Greatest thing is that you will leave ready to go the next school day.

Eric Rowles

FIERY CONVERSATIONS: Facilitating The Heat Without Getting Burned

Session Description

They’re the topics that you just KNOW could cause conflict – but does it really have to lead to physical and verbal drama? These are called Fiery Conversations – and for a reason! Come to this heated – but also HEALTHY – dialogue focused workshop to learn how to FACILITATE multiple points of view with young people. You’ll learn not one but FIVE different way to facilitate the Fiery Conversations and ensure that everyone can speak their mind… and agree to disagree.

Jeremiah Hopes, LPC, CAADC

I Can Stop Anytime I Want To BUT I Just Don’t Want To Substance Abuse Education and Treatment for Resistant Youth

Session Description

Drug use and abuse among our nation’s youth continues to present major concerns. Despite our best efforts, illicit drug markets continue to grow, young people continue to poison their brains and bodies and new synthetic and designer drugs continue to emerge from the lab to the lives of youth. This presentation will present innovative approaches and best practice methods to help educate and treat youth who are highly resistant to substance abuse services. Also, this presentation will present key strategies to quickly and effective connect with resistant youth and build a strong therapeutic alliance.

Mark Laughlin

Video Game Music: The Gamification of Music Pedagogy

Session Description

From the first beeps and bleeps of Pong in 1972 to the world’s most-subscribed massively-multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG), World of Warcraft, video games are part of our everyday lives and culture. The presentation will highlight the successes and failures of teaching an online video game music course to the college student-at-large.

Hotep

Behavior is a Symptom…Not the Problem: Getting to the Root

Session Description

Behavior is a Symptom demystifies the common behavior problems exhibited in schools by first explaining WHY they occur and the teaching HOW to change them. This workshop will: share the precursors that lead to all behavior, inform on how to transform academic and behavioral outcomes, explain what leads to at-risk behaviors and why people repeat the same negative behaviors and demonstrate how relevance and relationships impact behavior. In the end, attendees will be introduced to what is being called “The New PBIS”!

Anthony Outler

Moderator, Town Hall (Continued)

Kelly Astro

Promoting College Access for At-Risk High School Students in Central Florida: A Community-Based Intervention Model

Session Description

In this interactive session, audience members – which can include high school and college personnel and those interested in higher education advocacy – will have the opportunity to discuss the challenges and rewards of building partnerships in their community that are focused on increasing college access for at-risk high school students. We will also explore ways in which other institutions that are underrepresented in these types of prevention initiatives can become active in drop-out prevention.

Strand I

HEAD

Amie J. Stearns, IL Dept. of Juvenile Justice

Changing the Music: Understanding Educational Obstacles for Youth in Foster Care

Session Description

Due to increased tendency of children in foster care placements to perform poorly in school and to become involved with the juvenile justice system, there is a dire need for school districts to improve support systems for this vulnerable student group. This presentation may be of most interest to conference attendees as it explores the specific barriers which may hinder educational success for youth in foster care.

Strand II

HEART

David A. Levine, Director, Teaching Empathy Institute

The School of Belonging: A Culture Building Process for Schools and Classrooms

Session Description

A School of Belonging initiative is a process-oriented approach to professional development that creates cultural practices that embrace social and emotional learning as a cornerstone for a healthy learning community. Many educators with whom I’ve worked, see social and emotional learning as a “thing” or a program. It is neither. It is a mindset, a consciousness, a way of being. In a School of Belonging, SEL is infused into the fiber of the school through consciousness raising, skill development, and direct application within each interaction that takes place during the school day.

Strand III

HANDS

Martha Anne Tudor and Isabelle Schwartz

Sex Trafficking and Social Media: A Teen and Mom Speak Out

Session Description

This informative session illuminates the crisis going of commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) going on in our communities and schools, and how traffickers use social media to lure and trap young victims.

Strand IV

HEALTH

Pamela A. Larde

Creating Educational Environments that Nurture Post-Traumatic Growth in Students Overcoming Trauma

Session Description

The purpose of this session is to introduce the concept of post-traumatic growth, as well as to offer research-driven strategies designed to support, advocate for, and empower students who are managing traumatic or distressed home and family environments. Results are focused on how educators and health professionals can implement strategies and impart coping skills that nurture post-traumatic growth, helping students better integrate into the educational environment and advance to college while managing current or past traumatic experiences.

Strand V

HOME

Liya Endale and Dr. Miles Irving

Contextualizing Ethiopia as a Means of Healing the Black Identity Development of African American Boys

Session Description

This presentation is an overview of a two and a half week international service learning program that brought a chess team of eight African American boys to a village in Ethiopia to engage in service learning at a local school. The curriculum aimed to help the participants conceptualize race as a core component of self using the rich history of Ethiopia as a contextualizing factor through experiential learning and cultural immersion.
4:45pm

Meet & Greet

MC: JaHon Vance
Jazz Ensemble, Coastal Middle School, William Hoffman, Director

Tuesday

March 6, 2018
7:30am Registration Opens
7:30–8:30am Continental Breakfast
8:00am Exhibits Open
8:30–9:45am Session 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Timothy Allen

Increasing African American and Latino Parental Involvement In School

Session Description

Parental involvement is one of the leading indicators of student’s academic achievement. The lack of parental support often found within the African-American and Latino communities has often contributed to suspensions, expulsions and truancy. This interactive seminar will provide participants with useful strategies that can be used to increase the level of parental involvement and also help parents understand the importance of their role in their child’s academic success.

Marianna Brashear

Entrepreneurship Education Empowers Youth to Change their Lives

Session Description

Informational session about a fun and exciting hands-on workshop for teens placed at risk focused on the importance and applications of entrepreneurship. Whether you want to start a business or not, learning the entrepreneurial mindset is a must for all students no matter their current socioeconomic state or career path. This dynamic workshop can be facilitated by anyone and will inspire students to become self-reliant value creators for society and themselves. Students will feel empowered as they learn invaluable economic concepts, leadership skills, critical and creative thinking, and participate in individual and group projects which culminate in a Shark Tank competition! (Materials given to attendees at no charge).

Mr. Cary Holman and Jennifer Kinsman

New Outlets: Plugging In Makes a Difference

Session Description

When working with Youth-At-Risk populations, it is important to establish a climate and culture conducive to their academic and social success. School climate and culture are built by establishing student relationships, offering student engagement activities, and listening to student voice. This workshop will give specific tools and strategies that LaVergne Middle School has implemented to increase student interests and involvement throughout the school year. LMS has learned how to Development/ Implement New Outlets for students. Outlets: HOUSE character program Climate and Culture Strategies Student Events (Lock-In, Spring Formal, Tailgating) Clubs (Drama, Music Entertainment, Media, etc..) Faculty/Staff Retreat Professional Development

Dr. Summer Pannell and Ingrid Haynes, Ph.D.

Facilitating Biliteracy Development Through Culturally Efficacious Parental Engagement

Session Description

This presentation will focus on data from an engagement literacy program. Presenters will address how the use of non-traditional home engagement and culturally efficacious practices led to the empowerment of culturally and linguistically diverse families. By developing support, leadership, and advocacy, in addition to working with parents to bridge the literacy divide among family members and between the home and school, a sense of community for students, teachers, and family can be established.

Joe Markiewicz

Engaging Youth Leaders in Prevention Planning with Developmental Assets, Survey Data and Social Norms

Session Description

This workshop will provide education about the public health model approach and risk/protective factors for youth. It will also share best practices on ways to engage youth in classroom settings as well as large, multi-school student summits designed to address problem behaviors in schools and how the student planners can develop student action plans to achieve their goals. Examples of school-based activities and events using youth survey data will be reviewed.

Dawn White

Computer Games for Motivation

Session Description

Motivation is the key factor in the academic success of students. Tapping into students’ interests keeps them engaged in learning. One major interest in all students is computer games. Learn how to use computer games to help students improve their academic skills and impact their self-worth. Discover the numerous and free education games available on the Internet and how to use them to transform at–risk students into studious learners.

Dr. Tom Peterson

SPARK: Bad Attitudes Not Bad Kids

Session Description

Often plagued with problems not of their making, troubled youth find themselves in classrooms where they are quickly labeled as lazy, disruptive or defiant and quickly erect walls to insulate themselves to what is about to happen. A challenge for even veteran teachers and administrators is how to respond effectively to students whose classroom behavior they find disruptive, disrespectful, irritating, annoying, and a serious threat to classroom etiquette. The SPARK program began with a simple question; what can we do to we solve this problem in our community, inspire defiant youth, and prepare future educators to relate and communicate effectively?

Eliza M. Hirst, Esq., CWLS, Teri Lawler, MA, and Jessica Begley, M.Ed.

Strategies to Build Resilience in Students who Have Experienced Trauma or: Shifting from Trauma to Resilience–Strategies for Educators or Multi-Tiered Strategies to Build Resilience

Session Description

In this workshop, participants will learn specific strategies to help engage and connect with students who have been impacted by trauma and toxic stress. Effective tools – with little to no expense – will be presented to build relationships, enhance student engagement, and ultimately improve academic seat time and school achievement.

Jacqueline Y. Smart, EdD

What Makes A Bully?

Session Description

The purpose of this presentation is to address strategies on how to improve school climate or culture for youth who are placed at risk in our school systems. A sustainable, positive school climate fosters youth development, and learning necessary for a productive and satisfying life. A safe and supportive school climate can help prevent bullying. Safety starts in the classroom.

Victor Woods

Make The Connection & Improve School Climate

Session Description

This presentation is designed for all teachers and administrators prepared to face some inconvenient truths, in an effort to keep their schools free from drug addiction, violence, suicide and bullying in an attempt to create a positive safe environment for students and staff by bringing together students, educators, families and communities.

LaMarr Darnell Shields

Engage Me or Enrage!: Redefining Images of Young Men Of Color

Session Description

We are losing our boys – not only academically, but also behaviorally and attitudinally – and too o en, we fail to see the vulnerable young man who is hiding behind that tough-guy exterior. Boys’ under-performance – especially for boys of color and in poverty – is one of this country’s biggest barriers to school improvement and it is tied, at a very basic level, to the disconnect between boys’ sense of who they are and what school has to o er them. Turnaround for boys in school starts with understanding their inner lives – the social, emotional and biochemical drivers of boys’ motivation and engagement. This interactive workshop provides the building blocks of success through a powerful examination of male-female brain differences. In addition, Dr. Shields will share his new film, (Beyond Stereotypes) that will provide a platform for male students of color to validate important parts of their identities—parts that Black and Latino boys in American culture are typically pressured to silence or ignore.

Arion Jett-Seals

Holistic Advising: A Proactive Intervention for Success

Session Description

This session will introduce the process and effectiveness of holistic advising. The holistic approach to advising takes into consideration all of the intricacies of a person. Holistic advisors offer both an educational and mentoring experience to advisees. Taking previous advising models and applying a social work case management like strategy, creates a more holistic approach by offering wrap around services for students, allowing for a more proactive intervention method. We will discuss meeting the whole student, considering the student’s personal, emotional, cultural, financial, and familial issues before any can become a barrier, and negatively influence their educational success.

Strand I

HEAD

Dr. Cynthia C. M. Deaton and Dr. Sandra Linder

Encouraging Communication, Collaboration, and Ownership of Learning through the use of Mobiles

Session Description

This presentation is geared towards PreK-8th grade teachers who are interested in utilizing technology to support student creativity and understanding of STEM content. We will discuss how to effectively integrate mobile learning in inquiry-based lessons to support students in sharing their understanding of content in meaningful and creative ways. Participants will have a chance to work in groups to participate in iPad activities that can be modified for both formal and informal STEM learning experiences.

Strand II

HEART

Dr. Beverly Smith, LPC, CCMHC, ACS and Dr. Patricia Ford

Building the Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) capacity for students, faculty, and staff

Session Description

Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) is the process for equipping students and adults with the needed knowledge, attitudes, and skills to appropriately understand and manage emotions. Understanding and managing emotions are essential competencies for positive growth in the areas of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and in responsible decision making. Additionally, SEL is a process for individual and community empowerment for goal setting and goal obtainment while showing empathy in establishing and maintaining positive relationships (CASEL, 2016). This presentation focuses on enhancing the school culture and climate of a Title 1 School by intentionally building the Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) capacity of the students, faculty, and staff members. This is accomplished by having the following presentation objectives: (1) increasing the awareness of the importance of an inclusive Social Emotional Learning Curriculum (SEL) for student and faculty success with a Check and Connect framework, (2) demonstrating value-added in community partnerships for enhanced student learning opportunities, and (3) promoting the relevance of faculty/staff members participating in leadership problem-solving to build a positive school climate for students. The school-based audience attending this session will gain relevant and practical strategies/interventions for meeting the needs of inner city at-risk students.

Strand III

HANDS

George Darden and Jamie B. Lewis

Helping Pre-Service Teachers Understand the “T” and “Q” in LGBTQ

Session Description

The pre-service teachers we mentor at Georgia Gwinnett College are generally more confused by and less accepting of transgender and queer students than they are of lesbian, gay, and bisexual students. This presentation will help teacher educators consider ways that they may lead pre-service teachers to be more sensitive to the needs of transgender and queer youth.

Strand IV

HEALTH

Dr. Vickie Harden and Dr. Nikki Jones

Healthy Transitions: Peer Leadership among Youth with Behavioral Health Issues

Session Description

Healthy Transitions is a system of care model in which youth and young adults lead the development of programming, and are instrumental in the way in which services are delivered. This presentation will explore how to embed youth and young adult voice into programming, and empower youth and young adults experiencing mental health issues. The presentation informs participants about peer-led to support as part of recovery-focused life. Engaging community members, providers, and educators as part of this initiative, and forging opportunities outside of the traditional mental health system are part of the components discussed in this presentation.

Strand V

HOME

Ange Anglade, LaShaune Lee, LICSW, and Chanel Banks

Are You Real? Fake? What’s the Deal? Effective Parent Involvement Requires REALationships

Session Description

This session is for administrators, teachers, counselors and social workers who are interested in developing true partnerships with parents in order to increase involvement and engagement in student achievement. After school programs and schools are always looking for the “magic” activity that would guarantee interest and increase parental involvement; however often times, they overlook an important element which is how they are showing up in their relationship with parents. This session will challenge participants to look at their communication and relationship with parents, acknowledging their feelings about families and identifying how these feelings help or hinder their work with families. Participants will receive proven strategies and tools that will help them create true partnerships, gain parent support, and increase involvement.
10:15–11:30am Session 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Timothy Allen

Increasing African American and Latino Parental Involvement In School

Session Description

Parental involvement is one of the leading indicators of student’s academic achievement. The lack of parental support often found within the African-American and Latino communities has often contributed to suspensions, expulsions and truancy. This interactive seminar will provide participants with useful strategies that can be used to increase the level of parental involvement and also help parents understand the importance of their role in their child’s academic success.

Joe Hendershott

Reaching the Wounded Student

Session Description

Based on the presenter’s book “Reaching The Wounded Student”, this session will look at ways to encourage the wounded student to find academic and life success.  By looking at the effects of trauma, this practitioner will describe methods for boosting esteem, creating empathic connections, and cultivating community.  Other topics discussed will be devising alternative discipline to help students remain in the classroom, increase achievement, and ultimately graduate from high school.

Tabathia Baldy, Frederick Smith, Sr., Kristen Harrison, Elizabeth Jones

Improving Literacy Skills of all Students at the Secondary Level: A Practical Approach

Session Description

Secondary schools are often overwhelmed by the sheer number of students reading below grade level. Sadly, secondary educators are faced with either ignoring the problem or only intervening with a small number of students. In this session designed for educators, participants will learn how one school district is using a systematic approach within their large secondary schools to improve the literacy skills of ALL students.

Molly Ferryman

Re-imagining RTI: Creating a Multi-tiered Support System for At-Risk Secondary Sudents

Session Description

In this presentation, secondary administrators, Title I coordinators, and classroom teachers will not only learn how to establish buy-in for their developing RTI programs, but also how to develop a multi-tiered support system in their schools that successfully identifies at-risk and struggling students before they experience failure in the classroom. They will also learn how to implement RTI with efficacy and fidelity at the secondary school level, which is essential for increasing student learning and turning around low performing schools. Participants in this hands-on, interactive session will take away a wealth of information and materials which can be used to design a RTI model at the secondary level that incorporates high-quality instruction, frequent progress monitoring, increasingly intense levels of intervention and data-based decision making. Additionally, by actively participating in the decision making process and taking on the roles of IAT team members, attendees will learn how collaboration plays an essential role in identifying, documenting and evaluating a student’s progression through the multi-tiered support system that is Response to Intervention (RTI).

Sarah E. Coffey, M.S.Ed., LBA, BCBA, Lorraine Stallworth, Tony Majors, Ed.D., Kay Higgs, M.A.Ed., LeTrecia Gloster, M.S., Yvette Carter, M.S. and Keith Ekhator, PMSW, LSSW

Using the Cluster Support Team and Multi-Tiered Systems of Support to Provide Wraparound Services in a Large Urban School District

Session Description

In this presentation, participants will learn how a large, urban school district utilizes the Cluster Support Team model and Multi-Tiered Systems of Support to provide wraparound services to include school counselors, social workers, behavior analysts, restorative practitioners, and mental health specialists. Participants will receive an overview of support services, and review data from the district.

Jim C. Taylor, BCBA

From the Street to the Classroom

Session Description

This presentation will focus on how we as educators, family and community can work together to establish systems to maximize student success. Regardless of the interventions in place within the classroom success will be minimal unless interventions also include a family and community approach. This presentation will examine those interventions directed at improving student behavior through culturally aliened classroom interventions, increasing parent involvement, and increasing community involvement. We will examine present school policies and interventions that may inhibit the educational progress of at risk students as well as review partnerships that can be established between educators, parents and community that can strengthen appropriate student behavior. Finally the audience will participate in a group discussion of how they can facilitate a change in methods and approaches presently used to address the issues that occur when the street meets the classroom.

Michelle Thomas, Ed.D. and Aleta Townsel-Benson

Your True Colors

Session Description

The presentation deals with the HEART and HOME strands by providing the school with a climate that is conducive to learning in the classroom. It gives the participant a chance to examine their own biases and look at how that may impact students learning. It explains how cultural diversity is a positive attribute that brings awareness to the students in the classroom thereby creating a unified setting for all. It also gives tips as to how to deal with parents who are minorities by involving them and seeking first to understand them. Someone’s true colors is the kind of person someone really is rather than what the person seems to be.

Maegan Vick, Sarah McCausland Flint

Trauma Intervention Strategies for School Counselors: A Collaborative Approach

Session Description

This session focuses on educational and counseling strategies for school counselors working with children who have experienced and display trauma symptoms. This includes an emphasis on identifying the manifestation of trauma symptoms in the school setting and how those symptoms influence social, emotional, and academic success. Specific interventions, resources and strategies will be provided. These interventions will include consideration of elementary, middle, and high school students.

Bullying Panel

Moderator: Dr. Eric Landers
Panelists: Dr. Jacqueline Y. Smart, Ed.D., Kay Higgs, M.A.Ed., Dr. Patti Agatston, Dr. Anita D. Sanders, Dr. Robert “Colby” Jones, David Levine, Director, Teaching Empathy Institute, and Dr. Keonya Booker

Victor Woods

Make The Connection & Improve School Climate

Session Description

This presentation is designed for all teachers and administrators prepared to face some inconvenient truths, in an effort to keep their schools free from drug addiction, violence, suicide and bullying in an attempt to create a positive safe environment for students and staff by bringing together students, educators, families and communities.

LaMarr Darnell Shields

Engage Me or Enrage!: Redefining Images of Young Men Of Color

Session Description

We are losing our boys – not only academically, but also behaviorally and attitudinally – and too o en, we fail to see the vulnerable young man who is hiding behind that tough-guy exterior. Boys’ under-performance – especially for boys of color and in poverty – is one of this country’s biggest barriers to school improvement and it is tied, at a very basic level, to the disconnect between boys’ sense of who they are and what school has to o er them. Turnaround for boys in school starts with understanding their inner lives – the social, emotional and biochemical drivers of boys’ motivation and engagement. This interactive workshop provides the building blocks of success through a powerful examination of male-female brain differences. In addition, Dr. Shields will share his new film, (Beyond Stereotypes) that will provide a platform for male students of color to validate important parts of their identities—parts that Black and Latino boys in American culture are typically pressured to silence or ignore.

Dr. Paula Greathouse and Dr. Joan F. Kaywell

Developing Teachers’ Funds of Knowledge of Diverse At-Risk Adolescents Through Young Adult Literature

Session Description

If teachers want to be successful in reaching and teaching all learners, the development of funds of knowledge must continue throughout an entire teacher’s career, as classroom demographics are continually changing. This session spotlights the reading of YA literature to develop teachers’ funds of knowledge of diverse at-risk adolescents and how this experience can lead to culturally relevant pedagogies.

Strand I

HEAD

Mrs. Dianne Connolly and Mrs. Sara Hastings

Bull’s Eye – Hitting the Target for Every Student

Session Description

Hitting the reading target for every student requires precision, skill and practice. Learn how a dedicated Professional Learning Community of teachers, support staff, administration, and specialist created a targeted Tiered Reading System for all students. Shared mission + shared responsibility = shared success. Pentucket Lake school was recognized by the Massachusetts Commissioner of Education for their extensive turnaround work and closing the achievement gap. Participants will leave this session with the tools, videos, and training to implement this targeted instruction

Strand II

HEART

Dr. Tiffany N. Taylor, 2017 GASSP Principal of the Year

Tackling Climate Change: Building Positive Culture, Climate and School Success

Session Description

Does your organization need strategies to tackle climate change? Then this session is right for you. Come listen to the 2018 GASSP Middle School Principal of the Year share strategies for planning a school wide discipline plan and ways to monitor and measure success with professional learning communities.

Strand III

HANDS

Captain Lenny Gunther, Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department, Savannah, GA

Savannah Police Presentation

Strand IV

HEALTH

Dr. Adair F. White-Johnson and Tamiko Lowry-Pugh

Trauma, Teen Dating Violence and Academic Achievement: What Can We Do?

Session Description

This presentation is designed to share the scope and impact of teen dating violence on youth and the relationship to academic achievement. It will assist adults who work with youth to become prepared to recognize, prevent, and manage teen dating violence if it occurs in their school, youth group or organization. An introduction of the F.R.E.E. Formula – a practical model designed to teach educators and teens specific strategies and techniques to combat teen dating violence.

Strand V

HOME

Sarah C. Mayberry

Setting the Stage for Success: Empowering At-Risk Students

Session Description

Teachers and school leaders will gain an understanding of how students in an inner city, Title I elementary school have used goal setting, data tracking, and leadership habits to empower their learning and set the stage for student success. Participants will also learn how these practices have enabled students to participate in student led parent conferences.
10:00am– 12:15pm

Poverty Simulation

Facilitators: Dr. Deonn Stone, Dr. Aviva Geolman Rice, and Dr. Linda Ann McCall
Only 80 registrants

11:30am–1:00pm Lunch on Your Own
Click here to see where conference attendees can get discounts in Savannah.
1:00–2:15pm Session 6

Joanne Billingsley

Teaching Diverse Learners the Words They Need to Succeed

Session Description

Research tells us that students develop complex language skills, when they talk, read, write and share ideas about what they are learning. Engaging in open conversation, reading and writing collaboratively, allows students to learn from each other and practice using the academic language. By articulating their thoughts, students make connections to content and to others. In this session, participant will actively engage with strategies that effectively use imagery, gesturing, conversation, and word play as springboards to jumpstart conversations, enhance vocabulary, and develop reading and writing skills. Learn how to reduce stress, improve attitudes, and make reading a lifelong passion!

Lisa Williams, Jamie Thompson, Emily Holton, Ronny Green, Rudo Tsemunhu, and William F. Truby

Implementing the Innovative On Tour STEAM Art Integration Curriculum Program in a Georgia Title l School with Amazing Results!

Session Description

How did a Title l school located in a designated rural Georgia school district implement a Pilot On Tour STEAM Art Integration Curriculum Program to promote a balanced curriculum for Title I students? Findings and leadership practices from this study will be shared and presenters will be available during and after the conference along with supporting handouts.

Dr. Holly Hilboldt Swain

Cultivating Empathy through Project-Based Civic Action with Early Childhood Students and Students with Special Needs

Session Description

This session will provide innovative teaching strategies successfully used in Title I classrooms in rural Alabama to foster empathy using project-based teaching of active community service with students in early childhood and specifically with students with special needs. Differentiated examples of teaching volunteerism will be given for practical application of varied lessons designed to meet the multi-needs of inclusive classrooms. Presenters will showcase resources for engaging students in collective social action as attendees take an active role in a range of lessons first demonstrating building empathy inside the classroom and then outside the classroom through civic experiences with community service.

Dontay Williams LAPC, MA, MS, CAMS

Addicted Brain: Reducing Risk for Substance Abuse

Session Description

This interactive presentation aims to combat the growing epidemic of substance abuse within the community. The presentation is well suited for individuals of all ages. Topics will focus on preventing risk for substance abuse, raising awareness of the impact of addiction on the individual and family system. Lastly the presentation will provide participants with relevant skills, resources and education for overcoming addiction.

Steven Hornyak

Building a Better Risk Prevention Model

Session Description

This presentation chronicles the work of Houston County Schools in developing a risk prevention model built on more than ten years of longitudinal student data. In its second year of implementation, Houston At-Risk Profiles (HARP), has proven effective in identifying those students most in need of support and linking them to interventions and supports that lead to improved outcomes and significantly reduces the risk of failure.

Mean Girls Panel

Moderator: Dr. Mary Felton
Panelists: Cassandra Campbell, LaShaune Lee, LICSW, Phylicia Anderson, Chanel Banks, Adair White-johnson, Ph.D., Dr. Kiana Battle, Antoinette L. Dunstan and Natalie S. King, Ph.D.

 

Charmayne Adams, MA, NCC

Systemic Perspective of Conduct Disorder in Adolescents

Session Description

This presentation explores the systemic nature of conduct disorder and the effect it has on individuals, educational settings, and communities. It address the systemic nature of the diagnosis through Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Model and looks at interventions for each layer of the model. This presentation also acknowledges the disproportionate rate of youth-at-risk, especially male youth of color diagnosed with conduct disorder.

Wesley Montoya

Traditional Approaches to Hispanic Academic Success

Session Description

Present participants with strategies that discuss the cultural traditions that Hispanic families often follow in order to teach their children, discuss how to build relationships with Hispanic students and their families, discuss how to provide a family like atmosphere in school, discuss how to challenge and assist Hispanic students by allowing for the process of discovery on their own to help them grow academically.

Rajni Shankar-Brown

Digging Deeper: Understanding the Effects of Poverty on Youth and Collectively Working Towards Justice

Session Description

Poverty and homelessness are significant concerns that merit our immediate attention. Families with children make up the fastest growing segment of the homeless population in the United States and school-aged children experiencing homelessness are one of the most vulnerable groups in society. Through data, narrative research, and stories, this presentation will discuss the devastating impact of poverty and homelessness on students’ academic achievement, social-emotional wellbeing, and physical health — collectively calling educational stakeholders to intentionally negate and reverse many of these adverse effects. The presentation will illuminate the complex dynamics of poverty and its myriad effects on students, PreK-12, along with effective strategies to build holistic resilience, address trauma, and support the diverse needs of low-income students. Examples of responsive school-classroom practices, collaborative community initiatives, innovative ideas for promoting healthy development and increasing the educational opportunities for economically disadvantaged students will be shared. Participants will also receive a handout with practical strategies and a list of additional resources to help facilitate visible impact and positive change!

Dr. Marquita S. Blades

You’ve Got the POWARR!  An Integrated Approach to Literacy and STEM

Session Description

In this highly engaging session, participants will learn to use the POWARR Method© to encourage increased use of literacy in STEM courses. The POWARR method is a collaborative approach to writing, which requires students to evaluate their work through questioning, justification, and application of basic scientific principles.

Dr. Mark Warner

21st Century Teacher Preparation for Youth-at-Risk

Session Description

Youth-at-risk students entering schools today differ from those of the past in terms of their technological literacy and educational experiences. Therefore, according to The Association for Middle Level Education (formerly National Middle School Association) (NMSA, 2010), educators must discover relevant curriculum that enables constructivist pedagogy and “real world”, technology rich, authentic assessment that address national content standards to impact the learning of all students. In other words, if educators value youth-at-risk and thoroughly participate in the necessary preparation to teach them, then students and teachers must engage in active, purposeful learning that is challenging, exploratory, integrative, and culturally relevant.

Strand I

HEAD

Dr. Anne Katz and Vivian Bynoe

A Teaching-Learning Grant Initiative: Developing the Critical Literacy Instructional Abilities of Pre-Service Educators

Session Description

Pre-service educators in a section of “Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Diversity in Educational Contexts” were introduced to the concept of critical literacy. Throughout the course of the semester, students were provided with the opportunity to apply their knowledge of this framework through a series of discussions around the young adult novel, Does My Head Look Big in This? (Abdel-Fattah, 2008). Guest speakers— in the form of a local high school student who recently began wearing a hijab to school, as well as a visiting scholar who specializes in critical literacy—expanded students’ perspectives. Results of a pre and post-test, as well as reflections on strategies that can be utilized in a classroom to teach children and young adults to read from a critical literacy viewpoint, will be shared.

Strand II

HEART

Dr. Tammy Graham, Dr. Renee Jefferson, Koyu Mai, Gage Russell, Ashley Cannon, Mary Ile Taylor

Working Together: Building K-12/College Mentor Partnerships to Support Students with Learning Differences

Session Description

In an interactive discussion with audience members, presenters will share ideas for developing positive mentor-mentee partnerships between K-12 schools and colleges; discuss the impact of two recently established mentor partnerships, as well as perspectives from college student mentors and K-12 teachers of student mentees with learning differences; collaboratively examine data to discuss potential program adaptations; and provide mentoring activities that audience members can utilize.

Strand III

HANDS

Dr. Yvonne Hefner

Shattered Ground: Mental Health Disorders in Children – A Hidden Crisis

Session Description

This session will offer teachers an in-depth understanding of mental health disorders, including basic information about these disorders, background information to assist in identifying early warning signs, and strategies for supporting students that may suffer from a mental health disorder. Teachers will learn classroom strategies that will foster a positive learning environment which will help to support these students.

Strand IV

HEALTH

Dr. Barbara F. Turnage, Dr. Vickie Harden, Dr. Nikki Jones

Identifying and Fostering Health in Families

Session Description

Raising children to be healthy participating members of society is not an easy job. This presentation directly (1) defines characteristics of healthy families, (2) discusses strengths of LGBTQ+ families, and (3) provides strategies to work with parental mental health issues. This presentation helps attendees examine notions of family. The intended audience is anyone who work with families

Strand V

HOME

Dr. Tom Peterson, Mileigh Rabun, and Joshua D. Moore

Transforming Youth from Within

Session Description

This presentation will share SPARK Mentoring program’s journey of letting go of traditional behavioral models in working with youth from high-risk backgrounds. We will provide evidenced-based insight into creating a community of acceptance through a program that embraces identity and integrity as a way to connect undergraduate students and defiant youth. This workshop is for any individual who works with youth in any capacity.
2:45–4:00pm Session 7

Joanne Billingsley

Teaching Diverse Learners the Words They Need to Succeed

Session Description

Research tells us that students develop complex language skills, when they talk, read, write and share ideas about what they are learning. Engaging in open conversation, reading and writing collaboratively, allows students to learn from each other and practice using the academic language. By articulating their thoughts, students make connections to content and to others. In this session, participant will actively engage with strategies that effectively use imagery, gesturing, conversation, and word play as springboards to jumpstart conversations, enhance vocabulary, and develop reading and writing skills. Learn how to reduce stress, improve attitudes, and make reading a lifelong passion!

Dr. Leann Taylor

Collaborating with School Leaders and Librarians

Session Description

The image of the librarian was once generally stereotyped as a spinster, portrayed as a cranky, old, unmarried female whose only importance was to silence the sound of chatter and laughter created by children in the library.This image of the stereotypical librarian has often been reinforced through popular media. For instance, when visualizing a librarian, many envision Mary, George’s wife in the 1946 movie It’s a Wonderful Life. The objective is to dispel this stereotype using collaborative partnerships between school administrators and librarians.

Dr. Libby Parker and Dr. Amanda Lemons

Relate-Motivate-EDUCATE

Session Description

We will present K-12 Teachers and Administrators with materials and strategies to develop positive relationships with students and motivate them through the learning cycle and life. We will examine the impact of relationships and motivation on student achievement, especially students at-risk. Participants will become familiar with tools and strategies for developing relationships, explore instructional materials and strategies that promote character and growth mindset, and review assessment strategies and practices that motivate students and encourage growth.

Courtney Plotts

Strategic Approaches: Academic Success Strategies For At Risk Students

Session Description

The interactive session begins with a general introduction to model of teaching for at risk students and its its significance in online classroom culture. Lecture and small group activities are used to illustrate the application of various dimensions teaching strategies that increase student engagement and positive student outcomes in the classroom. This session closes with questions and answers and participants’ reflections.

Rural Education Panel

Moderator: Dr. Robert Lake
Panelists: Dr. Valerie Roberts, Dr. Vickie Harden, Dr. Tabitha Baldy, Dr. Summer Pannell, and Dr. Torian White

Session Description

Through a panel format engage in a discussion about rural education.

Christopher Conner

W.I.L.D. Fire: Reinvigorating and Reimagining the Campaign for Youth Engagement

Session Description

The Wildlife Immersion and Leadership Development (W.I.L.D.) Program provides paid, employment and leadership experiences for culturally diverse teens from under-supported communities in Jacksonville, Florida. Hear from the staff of this award-winning program to learn ways that modernize youth advocacy, promote cultural representation, refine nature connections, and support emerging leaders within your own communities

Todd Stephens, Angela Dalhoe and Tom J. Clees

Ethical Considerations for Behavioral Support: Least Intrusive Planning

Session Description

This sectional will identify levels of intervention to support the needs of learners. Multiple real life examples will be presented to describe levels of intrusiveness and how practitioners might use these to assure ethical and effective programming in schools, community-based programs, and clinical settings.

Mike O’Neal and Paul Fisher

Describing the Parent University Journey to the World

Session Description

The evolution of this program in the Savannah community over 19 years.

Amber Humm Brundage

Engaging in Data-Based Problem-Solving to Address Chronic Absenteeism Among PreK-12 Students

Session Description

The focus of this presentation is to increase participant knowledge and skill in data-based problem-solving of chronic absenteeism among PreK-12 students. The session will start with a brief overview of the literature related to the contributors, implications and interventions for chronic absenteeism and a description of tools to measure the reasons for chronic absenteeism from multiple informants. The tools to be covered in the presentation are the Reasons for Chronic Absenteeism (RCA) and the Reasons for Chronic Absenteeism-Parent (RCA-P).

Dr. Kiana Battle

Grief & At-Risk Behaviors: Through the Eyes of a Teen

Session Description

This presentation will explore the affects that grief has on adolescents, including at–risk behaviors, identity confusion, issues of self-worth, and many more. The presentation will illustrate the positive impact that grief counseling groups have among adolescents (with a special focus in the public school environment). Barriers that hinder the effective delivery of group counseling within the public school arena will also be addressed (such barriers are amount of time in the school day, student caseload, and administrative support). This presentation will also address the critical role that school social workers play, in effectively providing group counseling interventions to adolescents who are affected by grief and loss.

Marcia K. Wade

Enhancing Well-Being while Boosting Self-Esteem and Closing the Achievement Gap

Session Description

You can have increased well-being (physical, mental, and emotional!) and increased test scores…in just 15 minutes per day. In this session, understand how movement affects learning and well-being, review the data on a program that ramps up key skills, and understand how easy it is to help your students succeed!

Strand I

HEAD

Kasey Bozeman

Cultivating a Culture of Creativity – One Spam Carving at a Time!

Session Description

Greene, Eisner, and Robinson all agree that creativity and imagination are essential for learning. How can you have a creativity-building activity that also develops critical social, emotional, and life skills for youth-at-risk populations? Educators from all areas can learn how to implement a series of creative challenges, such as mind puzzles, mystery game, and even Spam (yes, the canned meat) carving!

Strand II

HEART

Aviva Goelman Rice, Linda Ann McCall and Jackie Odgen

The Poverty Simulation: Increasing Teacher Sensitivity for Students Living in Poverty

Session Description

This presentation describes the Poverty Simulation in southeast Georgia and its history. Survey data reveal increased teacher empathy toward students and their families who live in poverty. Strategies for improving the academic achievement and socio-emotional skills of children living in poverty are offered. Target audiences include educators and instructional designers. Hand-outs will be given, and participants are encouraged to dialogue with the presenters.

Strand III

HANDS

Matt Eldridge

Keeping Everyone Safe in a Violent Situation!!!

Session Description

Introduction of specific restraint methods to use in a violent situation happening in a public/private school setting. The following topics will be discussed–types of and causes of stress in the classroom; De-escalation techniques both verbal and non-verbal; safety rules; when and how to administer various restraint techniques and federal laws regarding restraint and isolation.

Strand IV

HEALTH

Dr. Karla Sapp

Dismantling The School to Prison Pipeline: Meeting the Needs of At-Risk Students of Color

Session Description

School mental health initiatives tend to seek to address the gap between at-risk students of color who need and those who receive mental health services and/or interventions that does not lead to exclusionary discipline. Dismantling The School to Prison Pipeline: Meeting the Needs of At-Risk Students of Color is a presentation that focuses on identifying interventions that incorporate both Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports with Mental Health, which would reduce the School to Prison Pipeline and promote healthy development among at-risk students of color.

Strand V

HOME

Keith Schumacher

Building Family Engagement Through Fathers and Father-Figures of Your Students Volunteering a Full School Day

Session Description

WATCH D.O.G.S. ® is a family engagement educational initiative that utilizes the influence of fathers and father-figures to provide active, positive, adult male role-models for the students. Come learn how to successfully launch the WATCH D.O.G.S. program in your school(s) to support education and safety, and increase family engagement.
4:00–5:30pm Poster Session Presentation
MC: JaHon Vance

Wednesday

March 7, 2018
7:00–8:00am Continental Breakfast
7:30am Registration Opens
7:45–8:00am Experience and Enjoy Therapeutic West African Drumming
Danny Daniels, Jill Sandiford, and Tom Harris
8:00am Exhibits Open
8:00–9:15am

Keynote Presentation

Dr. Jane Bluestein
Ensuring Every Student Succeeds with a Supportive School Climate

It’s tough to learn in an environment that doesn’t feel safe and supportive—not just physically safe, but also academically, behaviorally, socially, and emotionally safe! Let’s look at school climate through each of these lenses and see how we can make our learning environments engaging and inviting, even for defeated, defiant, and discouraged kids who may have had negative, contentious, and failure-oriented experiences in the past. For all grade levels and subject areas.

MC: Alisa Leckie
Introducer: Dr. Randy Shearouse

9:45–11:00am Session 8

Steven Edwards

Positive School Climate

Session Description

With the constant pressure of high stakes testing and high achievement standards the climate of a school can be compromised. This session will focus on specific strategies and techniques that can be implemented to create a positive school climate while at the same time enhancing student academic achievement. Participants will walk away with ideas that they can immediately implement in their schools.

Sarah Jones

Lost and Found in Transition: How Alumni of Foster Care Experience Transition in Higher Education

Session Description

School counselors, social workers, and school administrators (p-16) can benefit from this presentation, which emphasizes results from a phenomenological inquiry into the educational experiences of alumni of foster care. This presentation will emphasize the first person accounts of college students who were also in foster care. Their voice offers insight into the ways we can shape our practice in order to best meet the needs of some of our most vulnerable students.

Adam W. Jordan, Desmond Vaird, Allsion Reilly

Bridging the Gap: Understanding Student Perspectives of Mentally Healthy School Spaces in Alternative School Settings

Session Description

This presentation will offer the results of a qualitative study that utilized focus group research with alternative high school students in order to better understand their various perspectives of the components of a mentally healthy school space. Eight alternative high school students participated in the in-depth focus group. The results of the focus group were transcribed, coded using methods common to Grounded Theory research, and themes were developed. In this presentation, we will explore three themes and conclude by offering suggestions for classroom teachers and school administrators in regards to producing more mentally healthy and inclusive school spaces for students at-promise. In addition, this study was made possible through a deliberate school/university partnership. Tips for developing university/school partnerships to support youth at-promise will also be explored at the conclusion of the presentation.
Bluestein Q & A Session

Curlandra Lightfoot-Smith & Takeysha Lewis

Count Yourself In: A Village Approach to Combatting Truancy

Session Description

Participants will focus on the importance of a holistic approach addressing chronic absenteeism through Education, Motivation, Communication, and Collaboration. Participants are provided with low-cost/no-cost strategies to bring awareness to regular, punctual school attendance. Knowledge/strategies will be provided to identify and address students with trends of school absenteeism, how to communicate with teachers, parents, students, and the “new age” family unit. We will provide exciting, interactive experiences on initiatives and creative strategies as attendees leave with take-home practices to implement directly in the learning environment and in their community.

Kathleen Bevins, Justin Blietz, Carlos Grant

An Integrated Approach to Transforming School Culture and Climate

Session Description

In the age of buzzwords and phrases encompassing school culture and climate, how do we practically embed these pieces into a cohesive, equitable approach to teaching and learning? This session will focus specifically on integrating restorative practices, trauma-informed care, mindfulness, and intercultural development within the middle school setting.

Shauna Bock and Dan Wolf

Alternative To Expulsion Programs

Session Description

This presentation will explore a program that provides an alternative to expulsion, the pros, the cons and how to incorporate a program in your school district.

Joe Johnson

Working with “At-Risk” Students: Self Check

Session Description

This session is designed to illuminate the pitfalls of recognizing and maximizing one’s potential. We will address issues and current trends within the “At-Risk” community. Further, this session will provide participants with practical strategies to help develop self-awareness, understand identity and purpose, re-evaluate the meaning of “versatility”, and also provide strategies to work more effectively with “At-Risk” youth.

Danny Daniels, M.Ed., Phillip Block, M.Ed., Tatiana Rolles and Shovonne Williams, M.Ed.

West African Drum Therapy and Educational Empowerment

Session Description

This presentation is designed to introduce the benefits of a therapeutic West African drumming program to educators and mental health professionals. Participants will engage in a basic drumming class where they will experience the academic and socio-emotional benefits of drumming while practicing an African rhythm. How to relate American School Counselor Association (ASCA) standards as well as Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) and Common Core Georgia Performance Standards (CCGPS) will be explained and demonstrated by the presentation facilitators.

Keith Brown

Stand In the Gap: A Relevant Blueprint on closing the Ambition and Achievement Gaps between At-Risk Youth and those youth who are “perceived” as NOT At-Risk.

Session Description

Closing the Achievement Gap is the rallying cry in America today; however, a key tenet in doing so is closing the Ambition Gap, for if youth lack ambition (A desire to excel)- they are less likely to achieve, especially when burdened with a plethora of societal and educational forms of inequity. In this highly engaging session- Keith L. Brown will show Youth Advocates how their outlook and innovative output will directly impact the outcome of the youth they serve. In addition- he will provide tangible tools and strategies that will awaken youth to not only desire to excel- but transform that desire to into positive results (Self Efficacy).

Jean Belizaire

Table of a Second Chance

Session Description

This presentation will help to empower those who work with the drug addicted population to identify, increase, and incorporate better means of services.  Topics included: Mental health, public safety, drug treatment, recovery, trauma and counseling, and mentorship.

Strand I

HEAD

Anita Sanders

A, B, C, D, Schwa: Improving Literacy Instruction for Struggling Readers

Session Description

A, B, C, D, Schwa is a fast paced, research-based, hands-on literacy experience. This experience will allow teachers to reinforce strong instructional literacy practices with proven effectiveness. The activities support increasing academic achievement , student engagement, student generalization, and support research based reading for struggling readers.

Strand II

HEART

Dr. Lakeysha Hallmon and Simone Danielson M.Ed., ERES

Interconnectedness: Create a Culturally Aware School Environment / Cultural Awareness-Building Relationships?

Session Description

What happens when you are a teacher with a class of students whose cultural backgrounds are far different than your own? What happens when there is civil unrest in the community, in the world, and now your classroom is divided. How do you relate, establish trust and create a safe space that encourages social, emotional and academic growth for all students. In this workshop, through engaging conversation and interactive collaboration, we will provide essential tools to empower teachers to create a culturally conscious and aware after school program that nurtures relationships among students, teachers, and the community.

Strand III

HANDS

Whitney Wayne Meade

Creating Structured Environments: Teaching the Relationship Between Behavioral Choices and Outcomes

Session Description

Creating a structured environment where students are empowered to grow yet provides the needed structure to teach the relationship between behavioral choices and outcomes can mean the difference between long-term success and incarceration.  This presentation address the behavioral strategies that can be implemented in both educational and residential settings.

Strand IV

HEALTH

Neil Duchac, DrPH, Ph.D. and Jill S. Minor

Traditional and Emerging Practices in School Counseling: Working with the Gifted

Session Description

An awareness of the unique characteristics of gifted children is important for school counselors. Being gifted doesn’t mean that their self-identities align with their academic strengths. Students need guidance to navigate the murky waters of school, friendship, and the meaning of giftedness. Get activities for small groups to help students with challenges that include perfectionism, isolation, communication, and other intensities.

Strand V

HOME

Janet Morris

Phoenix Rising from the Ashes–A Last-Chance Approach to Turnaround School Culture

Session Description

Is poor student behavior and focus directing the daily sails in your school? Learn how to use student empowerment and student advocacy for smooth sailing. Young adults may arrive at our doorstep with nearly 20 years of at-risk factors on their shoulders, but simple steps can be taken to watch a Phoenix emerge from the ashes of low performance and distrust.
11:15am–12:30pm Session 9

Steven Edwards

Positive School Climate

Session Description

With the constant pressure of high stakes testing and high achievement standards the climate of a school can be compromised. This session will focus on specific strategies and techniques that can be implemented to create a positive school climate while at the same time enhancing student academic achievement. Participants will walk away with ideas that they can immediately implement in their schools

Phylicia Anderson

“Black Girl Magic”: Understanding our Misunderstood Black Girls Through Therapeutic Relationship Building

Session Description

BLACK GIRL MAGIC is a popular phrase that celebrates the beauty, power and resilience of black womanhood. Just like “magic” our black girls are often misunderstood and feared. Through implicit biases, stereotypes, and discrimination, many black girls are unable to tap into their full potential. As change agents, it’s our responsibility to break barriers and build therapeutic relationships to tap into BLACK GIRL MAGIC!

Donald Redmond

Narratives of Resilience

Session Description

The program combines aspects of narrative therapy and digital technology to increase self-esteem and confidence of adolescents and young adults. Techniques described promote verbal and artistic expression as a way to focus self-concept on successes and accomplishments instead of self-defeating inner dialogues.

Dr. Louis L. Fletcher and Dr. Kim Boyd

Using Restorative Practices to Create a District that Cares

Session Description

The presenters go beyond their narrative about the fundamentals of restorative practice (RP) to engage the participants in a dialogue on strategies for implementing restorative practices at the school district level. Many school leaders successfully implement restorative practices at the building level only to face resistance at the district level. The key to RP sustainability is institutionalizing fair process through revising district policies, engaging with the school board, and energizing the community. There is also a discussion on strategies for addressing resistance from teachers and other building administrators. The session demonstrates a leadership driven model empowered by grass roots advocacy.

Dr. Patti Agatston

Social Media, Online Cruelty and Cyberbullying: Update on the Youth Perspective

Session Description

Dr. Agatston will share findings from her focus group interviews with youth on the topic of social media and cyberbullying. These highlights include the youth perception of an increasingly blurred line between bullying and cyberbullying as well as some surprising views on helpful versus unhelpful responses to cyberbullying and online cruelty. She will highlight the need for prevention and response strategies that emphasize social and emotional literacy including a restorative practices framework.

David Little

Implementation of a Specific Schema Theory Strategy to Facilitate Reading Comprehension for At-Risk Readers

Session Description

Employing brain theory and semantic mapping activities to assist struggling readers with comprehension and vocabulary development.

Cassandra Campbell

Be a Friend First

Session Description

BFF stands for “Be A Friend First” a title selected by girls, BFF was created for middle school girls to help them develop healthy relationship skills. Girls in this program begin to learn and understand relational aggression and the damage it can cause leaving scars in a relationship, they will also learn about conflict resolution and bullying prevention strategies. The presentation is for anyone who works with middle school girls in school ,after school programs., church , local housing authority, and other government funded organizations.

Joe Johnson

Working with “At-Risk” Students: Self Check

Session Description

This session is designed to illuminate the pitfalls of recognizing and maximizing one’s potential. We will address issues and current trends within the “At-Risk” community. Further, this session will provide participants with practical strategies to help develop self-awareness, understand identity and purpose, re-evaluate the meaning of “versatility”, and also provide strategies to work more effectively with “At-Risk” youth

Keith Brown

Stand In the Gap: A Relevant Blueprint on closing the Ambition and Achievement Gaps between At-Risk Youth and those youth who are “perceived” as NOT At-Risk.

Session Description

Closing the Achievement Gap is the rallying cry in America today; however, a key tenet in doing so is closing the Ambition Gap, for if youth lack ambition (A desire to excel)- they are less likely to achieve, especially when burdened with a plethora of societal and educational forms of inequity. In this highly engaging session- Keith L. Brown will show Youth Advocates how their outlook and innovative output will directly impact the outcome of the youth they serve. In addition- he will provide tangible tools and strategies that will awaken youth to not only desire to excel- but transform that desire to into positive results (Self Efficacy).

Strand I

HEAD

Patrick E Carter III and Victoria Lockhart

Got Groups? Redefining Small Groups Through Tiered Intervention Systems

Session Description

With the many tasks placed on educators and administrators, how do we create and provide this “optimum’ support for our students? In an elementary school it is imperative to address students’ academic and social needs head on and provide optimum support. This interactive presentation will provide attendees with a different perspective on how to use “tiered intervention systems.”

Strand II

HEART

Dr. Angela S. Coaxum-Young

Take the Limits Off!!!

Session Description

Education and access…let’s talk about it!

This session will outline methods, programs and ideas to help mitigate some of the disparities that exist in underprivileged communities due to lack of exposure to opportunities or inadequate fiscal resources. We will also examine the concept of “school dependent” youth and some of the circumstances that may render them at-risk. Finally, the presentation will review some of the best practices of Favor Academy of Excellence (Our Programs and Success Rates) that have served to positively impact youth at-risk.

Strand III

HANDS

Drew Zwald

Deter Juvenile Delinquency Utilizing Interscholastic Sports

Session Description

The relationship between interscholastic sport and juvenile delinquency has been a topic of discussion for many years. One reason cited by educators, sociologists, and parents for including sports programs in educational and community settings is their potential for diminishing delinquency (Donnelly, 1981). However, several sociologists have presented an alternative view. For example, Tappan (1949) has stated that sport is no deterrent to delinquency, providing evidence that if a child is prone to law violations, it will probably take more than sport to effectively stop the pattern of law violations. The purpose of this presentation is to examine both the positive and negative effects of interscholastic sport on juvenile delinquency, with the notion of further discussion for new ideas and mindsets.

Strand IV

HEALTH

Stephanie A. Davis, BSW

First Offenders Drug Diversion: An Alternative to Zero Tolerance

Session Description

A District modified drug intervention service for students receiving their first zero-tolerance drug offense. This initiative in its seventh year, aims to decrease the risks associated with drug use and increase parental influence and involvement to decrease use.

Strand V

HOME

Kate E. Crockett and Daniel T. Jeng

Being an Advocate for the Effective Integration and Education of Refugee Children

Session Description

Georgia and the United States have a growing refugee community (Division of Family and Children Services, n.d.). Successful refugee resettlement and K-12 education is dependent on school personnel understanding the emotional wellness and challenges of this population. Advocating on behalf of this population, this presentation will address the state of refugees in the United States and Georgia and their unique experiences adjusting to a new community and society. Information and discussion will address the various emotional roadblocks to refugees that can be an impediment to successful integration in K-12 schools. Presenters will also provide participants with available resources to address these challenges and seek further education.

Last updated: 2/9/2018

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PO Box 8124 • 847 Plant Drive • Statesboro, GA 30458-8124 • (912) 478-5555 • conted@georgiasouthern.edu